• The Critical Challenges of Human Trafficking & Corruption

    On September 20, 2018, UNA-NCA's International Law Committee and The Partnership for Transparency Fund presented The Critical Challenges of Human Trafficking and Corruption before an overflow crowd at the United Nations Foundation. Human Trafficking and Corruption are too often considered in separate silos. This program demonstrated that they are inextricably connected. Organized crime could not pursue human trafficking without the explicit cooperation of public officials. Principal Speaker Katie Ford, former CEO of Ford Models and founder and CEO of Freedom For All, told the chilling stories of two young women who had become human slaves and, fortunately, were saved by Katie's organization. The first woman’s name is Grace, a native of an African country, with a graduate degree in Norway. Grace’s story started after she responded to a job offer in a Gulf country, little did she know that she would soon be forced to work in a sexually abusive environment as a domestic worker. Not only did she receive no pay for her work, but she was told she owed a debt of $2,500 to her captors. When others in similar situations were told by a woman from their home country that she would pay their debt, they were forced into prostitution and some were never heard from again. Grace was rescued by Katie's organization. After being rescued Grace started an organization to prevent others from being trafficked. Soon after a man named Sam, promised to help her start the organization and became the organization’s first chairmen, ended up sexually harassing Grace as well. As Katie described it, every aspect of Grace’s story was marred with bribes and corruption. While a majority of the victims come from developing countries and Central and Eastern Europe, they all too often end up enslaved in Western developed countries. The second woman’s name was Shandra. Shandra had earned a college degree and had been a trader at an international bank in Indonesia. She paid $3,000 to get a job in the United Sates. She was provided with a visa and a flight to New York City, was greeted upon arrival with a professional looking sign. Upon arrival at the house where she expected to work, a gun was placed to her head and she was forced to work as a prostitute in New York City and Connecticut. She was sold from person to person and even escaped twice, but to no avail, the police she turned too after escaping didn’t even believe her story. While the United States is the leader in combatting trafficking, it’s police force still lacks the necessary funding for adequate training and enforcement. Principal Speaker Amb. Lou deBaca, now a professor at Yale University, was formerly Ambassador-at-Large and Senior Advisor to the Secretary of State on Trafficking in Persons, and Director of DOJ's Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking ("SMART"). Ambassador deBaca placed the issues at this forum in both an historical and a public policy context. He not only noted the long history of slavery, but summarized events in the U.S. that underscored that forms of human slavery have continued here and are rarely prosecuted. He stressed that while much is being done to counter both corruption and human trafficking, the responses are far too little, given the magnitude of the problems and the highly organized approaches of the criminals running transnational human trafficking operations. Panelist Kelly Ann P. Whelan, Consultant to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, Vienna, provided a UN perspective, noting its engagement, as well as her recent experiences in Ukraine. The country situation she described added significantly to the audience's knowledge of not only how pervasive trafficking is, but of how it is enabled by corrupt public officials at every level. Panelist Frank Vogl, Co-founder of Transparency International and Partnership for Transparency Fund, and author of the recent book Waging War on Corruption, stressed that legal solutions alone will not suffice and that the challenge has to be seen as well from a moral perspective. Now, on the 70th anniversary of the Declaration of Human Rights, it is imperative that efforts be redoubled on every front to counter human trafficking. The goals of human rights and anti-corruption organizations are fundamentally the same-- to ensure that everyone everywhere can live a life of dignity. This demands far deeper partnerships between civil society organizations engaged in countering human trafficking and those in the realm of anticorruption. In a discussion that was moderated by Robert Craft, Senior Counsel, Sullivan & Cromwell, and Co-chair of UNA-NCA's International Law Committee, the audience’s questions largely focused on what practical measures could and should be taken.  One question from the audience asked about the use of crypto-currencies as ways the traffickers secure illicit funds without detection. The panelists noted that so far this does not appear to be a major factor, but more generally efforts to curb international money laundering need to be a major part of the assault on the criminals engaged in trafficking. Partner Watch the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yixbIte8qNUSee more from the Anti-Corruption Forum


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  • Civil Society Fighting Corruption in Procurement

    Fighting corruption and waste in procurement requires not only capable procurement professionals, but also a strong civil society to monitor suspicious activity and engage authorities. Partnership for Transparency (PTF) teamed up with the International Anti-Corruption Academy to discuss how civil society can contribute to the fight against corruption in procurement. Listen to PTF Advisers; Sabine Engelhard, Lars Jeurling and Donal O'Leary; in an interview with Professor Christopher Yukins of George Washington Law School, Programme Director of Procurement Anticorruption Training. You may also like Civil Society Fighting Corruption in Procurement Procurement Training by PTF-India and Management Development Institute New Programs in 2017 Chile’s National e-Procurement Platform Hosts PTF Advisors Program to Strengthen Ukrainian Civil Society’s Role in Monitoring Public Procurement Launches on 24 January in Kyiv E-Procurement Monitoring in Ukraine Citizen Action for Accountability in Education Procurement Training on Preventing Corruption in Public Procurement and Judicial System Transparent Public Procurement in Serbia Sangguniang Kabataan Watch Exit Plan


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  • PTF partners with the Cyprus Integrity Forum

    Washington D.C., June 28, 2018 – Partnership for Transparency and the Cyprus Integrity Forum signed a memorandum of understanding on June 26, 2018 for cooperation aimed at fighting corruption and…


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  • 2017 Annual Report Released

    We are excited to release our 2017 Annual Report showing how Partnership for Transparency (PTF) has created and sustained impact throughout 2017, building on now 17 years of…


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  • PTF joins TAP Network 2030 as a Partner

    Partnership for Transparency is pleased to announce it has joined the TAP Network 2030 as a partner organization. The Transparency Accountability & Participation (TAP) Network 2030 is  broad network…


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  • i-PANTAWID Project Workshop Underscores Salience of Social Accountability in 4Ps

    BAGUIO CITY, April 27, 2018, Project i-Pantawid partners and stakeholders shared and discussed case stories of how citizens and government engaged each other that resulted in improved health and education service delivery, reduced benefit gaps, empowered Parent Leaders, and more responsive government.  The project final workshop highlighted the importance and urgency of Social Accountability in implementing social protection programs such as the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program. The project, Guarding the Integrity of the Conditional Cash Transfer Program in the Philippines (Project i-Pantawid), held the final workshop at Golden Pine Hotel in Baguio City on April 26-27, 2018. An exposition of Social Accountability case stories illustrated how the practise of Social Accountability has prompted change in the lives of 4Ps beneficiaries, and ultimately, the larger community.   Parent Leaders Facilitate Change The main platform for introducing and practicing Social Accountability was the Enhanced Family Development Sessions (eFDS).  Parent Leaders (PLs) are 4Ps beneficiaries as well, chosen to assist in implementing the program.  Under Project i-Pantawid, PLs were trained to cascade lessons – mostly active citizenship lessons - to their respective groups; and to lead their groups in engaging with government, to claim their rights, and to actively participate in community affairs. Stories were told of PLs overcoming their confidence gaps – from being timid and uninvolved due to their low socio-economic status – to empowered community leaders.    Accounts of PLs’ leadership were shown in their implementing and monitoring group projects such as communal vegetable gardens, barangay budget monitoring, feeding programs for malnourished children, and concluding social contracts with their municipal governments. At the close of the 2-day workshop, exemplary PLs were given a Certificate of Award, recognizing their performances as facilitators of eFDS modules and initiating changes in their communities. The Global Partnership for Social Accountability-World Bank (GPSA-WB) provided resources for the Project i-Pantawid that was implemented by local CSO partners and the consortium of Project i-Pantawid partners comprising ed of the Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG),  Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF), RECITE, and Affiliated Network for Social Accountability in East Asia and the Pacific (ANSA-EAP).  CCAGG is the lead NGO and hosts the project management office at 2ND Floor, DZPA Building, Rizal cor. Zamora Streets, Bangued, Abra. i-Pantawid Partners


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  • PTF Asia awarded grant for Grassroots Governance Program in Philippines

    PTF Asia (PTFA) is delighted to report that the Board of LifeBank Foundation Inc. (LBF) has now approved a proposal for the replication of the LBF Grassroots Governance Program with…


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  • World Bank Investigation & Prevention: Global Systemic Impact

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=isO73pIO4sgFeaturing Pascale Hélène Dubois, Vice President, Integrity, World Bank Group Kathrin Frauscher, Deputy and Program Director, Open Contracting Partnership Hasan Tuluy, Board Director, Partnership for Transparency and former Vice President, World Bank Moderator Charles Kenny, Director of Technology and Development and Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development Intruduction Frank Vogl, Partnership for Transparency and Transparency International DescriptionThe World Bank Group committed nearly $60 billion for development projects and programs in fiscal year 2017.  As the largest individual source for development finance in the world, the Bank frequently sets standards and adopts practices that spread both to other multilateral institutions as well as governments worldwide. In 2017, the Integrity Vice Presidency (INT), an independent office within the World Bank Group that investigates and pursues sanctions related to allegations of fraud and corruption in World Bank Group-financed projects, opened 51 investigations and issued 52 reports covering 68 Bank Group projects, while also providing preventative services and undertaking internal investigations. Through its Integrity Compliance Office, INT plays a preventive role by actively engaging sanctioned entities in pursuing rehabilitative measures, such as the implementation of integrity compliance programs. These activities helped safeguard the World Bank Group’s funding against misuse, but was there a broader impact beyond the contracts and contractors involved? Partners


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  • Procurement Training by PTF-India and Management Development Institute

    Partners For Transparency Foundation India (PTF India) with the support of Management Development Institute (MDI) Gurgaon organized a three-day residential program, titled,” Making Procurement Transparent and Efficient: Global Best Practices…


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  • World Health Day: Social Accountability Improving Healthcare

    On this World Health Day, Partnership for Transparency (PTF) reflects on how social accountability and citizen engagement can improve health services. Giving citizens a voice can help ensure that programs…


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