• Health Transparency Initiative in India

    The Health Transparency Initiative supports projects to raise citizen voice and monitor health sector performance. The pilot project, in Kerala India, is introducing participatory and transparent procurement and distribution of drugs and medical equipment and conducting social audits of basic health service delivery. In developing countries, corruption in the health sector represents one of the most significant challenges to the delivery of effective health care and to the efficient use of public resources. Drugs and medical supplies disappear from clinics, and available drugs are often counterfeit. Hospitals require prepayment for services that should be provided for free. Corruption in the procurement of drugs, medical equipment and supplies leads to diversion of scarce resources, and overpriced products and goods of inferior quality. It has been estimated that corrupt practices in the health sector may total more than $400 billion annually, or about 15% of the more than $3 trillion spent on health globally. The situation in the Thrissur District of Kerala, India, is particularly acute.  At the General Hospital, all seven surgical theatres, intended to perform more than 2000 procedures per month, have remained closed for over a year after a court order deemed them inhabitable because of a rodent infestation. Likewise, an audit report from the Comptroller & Auditor General (CAG) of public health care in Kerala in 2014 noted that drugs expired drugs distributed to patients and irregular supply of medicines leading to artificial drug shortages, consequently forcing poor patients to buy essential medicines at higher prices from private sources. In order to address the problems in Thissur and begin to build the knowledge base for fighting corruption in public healthcare worldwide, PTF is supporting a project led by local CSO, Jananeethi, to improve operational quality and efficiency of healthcare services reducing corruption in health service delivery. The year long project will focus on two primary objectives: 1) introducing participatory and transparent procurement and distribution of drugs and medical equipment and 2) produce Social Audits of basic health services delivered at Primary Health Centres (Panchayath Level), Community Health Centres (Block Level), and the District Hospital (District Level). Through the program Jananeethi will: File right to information applications to collect and analyze data on the quality/availability of health services and local fund utilization Identify irregularities, inefficient and corrupt practices and inform the public and government officials, and when necessary and appropriate, file Public Interest Litigation in the High Court of Kerala Conduct a baseline survey on the perceived quality of care of public health care users Interview and conduct focus group discussions with medical and non medical staff, members of Hospital Development Committees, members of Local Governments, Civil Society Organizations and the Media Disclose information on the services available at the hospital, rights of patients through display boards Organize public hearings for aggrieved patients persons These activities are expected to lead to increased citizen participation in monitoring and pressuring the government to insure the quality of public health service delivery.   Program Location Program Partner Program Documents Proposal (November 22, 2016) Program Advisors Indira SandilyaPTF India Board Member × Indira Sandilya PTF India Board Member Indira Sandilya worked in India as a communication consultant with the Confederation of Indian Industry. When she moved to the Philippines, she joined Conservation International (CI) as a Manager of Communications. After moving again, to Washington, DC, she worked in CI’s head office on the Population Environment program of the Philippines. She has also been a consultant with the World Bank, USAID, and the Asian Development Bank, working in Afghanistan, Cambodia and Bhutan. Since joining PTF, she has mentored four projects in Karnataka and currently leads PTF’s Gender Working Group. She is also on the Board of PTF India and is Project Adviser to the Health Transparency Initiative in Kerala. Indira has a BA in Nutrition, a diploma in Commercial Art and a Masters Degree in Communication Research. A. Edward ElmendorfProject adviser × A. Edward Elmendorf Project adviser Ed Elmendorf has been engaged in international organizations – especially the UN and the World Bank – professionally and as volunteer, for over 50 years. He served in the US Foreign Service as Adviser, Economic and Social Affairs, at the US Mission to the UN in the 1960s, and worked for two years in the UN Secretariat prior to starting a 30 year career in the World Bank. In the World Bank he served as policy planning officer, led lending programs in North Africa, and was deeply engaged in the design, financing, negotiation, and monitoring of economic reform programs and health projects and policies in Sub-Saharan Africa. He co-authored Better Health in Africa (World Bank, 1994). He is an active volunteer in the United Nations Association of the USA and other NGOs. He returned for a year to full-time employment as CEO of UNA-USA, to lead it into an alliance with the UN Foundation, and served as study director for a recently published history of UNA-USA: The UN Association-USA: A Little Known History of Action and Advocacy (Lynne Rienner, 2016). Vinay BhargavaProject Adviser × Vinay Bhargava Project Adviser Vinay served as the senior adviser for Public Sector Governance at the World Bank in 2006-7. From 2002-06 he was World Bank Director of International Affairs and Operations and was responsible for outreach to civil society organizations. Prior to that he was for six years the World Bank`s Resident Representative and Country Director for the Philippines. Vinay has over 25 years experience in economic development and donor assistance covering Asia, Africa, Middle East and Eastern Europe. He was the lead author of a report on Combating Corruption in the Philippines (2000) and on Challenging Corruption in Asia. He also contributed a chapter to the book The Many Faces of Corruption (2007). He has a PhD in agricultural economics. Rajat NagBoard Member × Rajat Nag Board Member Canada Rajat Nag was the Managing Director General of the Asian Development Bank in Manila from 2006 to 2013 and has held several other top positions at the ADB. Rajat is internationally well known for his intellectual leadership, extensive operational experience, and in-depth knowledge of development issues, particularly in infrastructure financing, public-private partnerships, and regional cooperation. His research interest is in working to enhance regional cooperation and integration in Asia. He holds engineering degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and the University of Saskatchewan in Canada. He also has Masters Degrees in Business Administration from Canada and in Economics from the London School of Economics.


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  • E-Procurement Monitoring in Ukraine

    Improving Transparency and Effectiveness of Public Procurement in Ukraine through Cooperation with Civil Society is a program to train CSOs in Ukraine on how to monitor public procurement under the country's new e-procurement system – “ProZorro." The training will provide tools and present best practices for procurement monitoring internationally. Public procurement is a major item in state and local government budgets in Ukraine. There is considerable evidence that this procurement could be done more efficiently and more transparently to reduce the corruption that is plaguing the country. A law enacted last year mandates the use of an e-procurement system – ProZorro – from municipal to national levels. The new system will make it easier for civil society organizations (CSOs) to monitor procurement in all of its phases, but training is necessary to enhance their ability to do so in an informed and responsible manner. Monitoring procurement requires technical knowledge of the procurement process as well as a good understanding of the legal and institutional environment in which procurement decisions are made. PTF is working with the Kyiv School of Economics (KSE) to implement a two-year program to strengthen the capacity of Ukrainian CSOs to monitor public procurement of goods and services. It will develop tools provide training to help CSOs and journalists identify irregularities and bring evidence-based reports of abuse to the attention of the responsible authorities using information generated by the Prozorro system. The program will target CSOs and activists in all parts of Ukraine, especially outside of Kyiv, who are engaged in anti-corruption activities or monitoring public procurement transactions or who have interest and potential to develop expertise in monitoring public procurement transactions. It will also support journalists who work in areas related to corruption investigation or monitoring of public procurement. News & Updates Program to Strengthen Ukrainian Civil Society’s Role in Monitoring Public Procurement Launches on 24 January in Kyiv The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) and the Kyiv School of Economics (KSE) announced the launch of a two-year program to strengthen the capacity  of Ukrainian Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) to monitor public procurement of goods and services, particularly using the ProZorro e-procurement platform rolled out by […] Continue reading Program Location Program Partner Program Funder European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Program Documents EBRD AUDIT OF PROZORRO in ukraine (1 mb) Program Videos Program Launch in Kiev (Full) PTF Program Team Sabine EngelhardProgram Adviser × Sabine Engelhard Program Adviser Sabine is a lawyer specialized in procurement whose career focus has been in international development, capacity building and governance-related issues. She worked at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) where she held various senior positions, at the World Bank, and in the private sector, with a prominent international law firm, and heading the Washington office of  a consulting firm. Sabine has spearheaded procurement reforms in countries of Africa, Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Latin America and the Caribbean. She has been involved in high-profile international initiatives with the OECD and the WTO, to strengthen country procurement systems and prevent risks of fraud and corruption in the use of development resources. She has also led important projects to develop new policies, modernize the procurement function in private and public organizations, teach, and strengthen, contract management.  She is currently an Advisor to PTF’s project on procurement monitoring for Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in Ukraine. She is a lecturer and a course adviser at the International Law Institute (ILI) in Washington D.C. She also teaches in the Procurement Master’s Program of the International Training Center of the International Labour Organization (ITC/ILO) in Turin, Italy.  She is a member of the UN Contract Award Review Board. Lars JeurlingProgram Manager × Lars Jeurling Program Manager Lars Jeurling has been an adviser to the Partnership for Transparency Fund since 2004 working mostly on Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union. Lars worked for nearly 30 years at the World Bank in different positions and in different parts of the world, such as Latin America Indonesia and, since 1991, in the former Soviet Union. After retiring from the World Bank in year 2000 Lars has been a private equity investor and entrepreneur and established a small fund in 2014 to match individual contributions to PTF. Lars holds an MBA from the Stockholm School of Economics and a MA in Development Economics from the Fletcher School of Law and Economics. Wilson Gallagherresearch assistant × Wilson Gallagher research assistant Wilson Gallagher graduated from the University of Vermont in 2014 with a double major in History and Economics. He began working for PTF in 2015. Currently Wilson is working on a project training Ukrainian Civil Society Organizations to monitor public procurement exercises. He is analyzing civil society activities around public procurement globally to identify best practices in preventing corruption. Ariel Shaker-BrownOperations Officer × Ariel Shaker-Brown Operations Officer Ariel is the Operations Associate for the Partnership for Transparency Fund. Before joining PTF, Ariel was the Program Coordinator for the German Marshall Fund’s MENA Partnership for Democracy & Development in Tunis, Tunisia. Throughout her time at the German Marshall Fund, Ariel opened the Tunis regional office and provided on the ground support for all MENA program activities. Prior to her Tunis posting, Ariel supported the German Marshall Fund’s Foreign Policy program as program assistant in the Washington, DC headquarters. Ariel received her Bachelor’s Degree in Government with a minor in Arabic from the College of William and Mary. While at William and Mary, she spent 6 months studying at the University of Jordan in Amman. Karin MillettProgram Adviser × Karin Millett Program Adviser Dr. Karin Millett is an experienced international development expert with broad geographic experience (Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, East/Southeastern Europe and Central Asia), and in-depth experience in private sector development, foreign direct investment, trade and competitiveness. She retired as a Director of the World Bank in 2010, following 16 years in senior roles at the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency, World Bank Institute, Joint Africa Institute (joint facility of IMF, World Bank and African Development Bank), and as head of the Investment Climate Advisory Services Hub (IFC/World Bank) for Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region, based in Vienna, Austria. Since leaving the World Bank, Dr. Millett’s assignments have included serving as Project Leader for the Regional Partnership to Promote Trade and Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa, funded by the Government of Finland and implemented by the Earth Institute at Columbia University; consultant to the Columbia Sustainable Investment Center on project in Haiti; World Bank consultant on systematic country diagnostics on Bosnia/Herzegovina and Kosovo; advisor with Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) on increasing transparency and reducing corruption. Currently working with PTF on a project to enhance capacity of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) in Ukraine to monitor e-procurement, particularly through utilization of data generated through ProZorro, the new e-procurement platform in Ukraine. Pietronella van den Oeverprogram adviser × Pietronella van den Oever program adviser Pietronella van den Oever is retired from the World Bank and is currently (2011 – 2012) a Visiting Scholar at the Population Reference Bureau in Washington DC, where she is writing a book about her working experience in Africa. In addition she held positions at the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in Switzerland, and worked for seven years in field assignments in agricultural development for FAO in West Africa. Her main professional focus is on population and economically and socially sustainable development. She holds a Master’s from Cornell University in International Rural and Agricultural Development, and a PhD from the University of Southern California in Sociology, with a major in Demography and a minor in Development Economics. Oscar CabelloProject Adviser × Oscar Cabello Project Adviser Oscar Cabello is a civil electrical engineer (Universidad de Chile) and an expert in information and communications technologies (ICT), advanced regulation of the telecommunications industry, and technical support for antitrust lawsuits. Mr. Cabello is currently the executive director at Alfa Centauro S.A., an international consultancy firm based in Chile, whose telecommunications experience is applied to a wide range of industries. In his recent consulting work, he supported Subtel (the Chilean Telecommunications Authority) to identify and analyse different investment models that the State could consider to implement the National Plan of Telecommunications Infrastructure, based on a public-private partnership. He also consulted with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to develop presentations about operators with significant market power (SMP) and costing methodologies for broadband services (Nassau, Bahamas, April 2015). Oscar Cabello is an active member of the Chilean Engineers Association’s Telecommunications Commission. He is also a university lecturer at the Free Competition Centre of the Chilean Catholic University; formerly he was lecturer of Technical and Operative Planning of Telephone Systems (EL 638), at the Engineering Faculty of Universidad de Chile. Björn WelleniusProject Adviser × Björn Wellenius Project Adviser Björn Wellenius advises governments, law and consulting firms, and international development organizations on telecommunications policy, regulation, and economics in emerging markets. He has worked in over 40 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Midle East, and Latin America. Publications include five books on telecommunications and economic development as well as best practice notes and technical papers. Until 1999 Dr Wellenius was the World Bank’s Telecommunications Adviser. Previously he was Professor of Telecommunications at Universidad de Chile. Dr Wellenius has a PhD degree in engineering sciences from the University of Essex, England, and a graduate engineering degree from Universidad de Chile. He is fluent in English and Spanish and has a working knowledge of French. Ram JanakiramProject Adviser × Ram Janakiram Project Adviser Ram Janakiram is a project advisor in PTF and member of the Ukraine procurement project team. He has over 35 years of operational experience in the design, implementation, and impact evaluation of World Bank financed projects in infrastructure, irrigation, agriculture and rural development sectors in low to medium income, conflict affected and transition economies, public procurement reforms, empowering rural communities, information and knowledge services, decentralization and improving governance. His work on procurement includes preparing procurement plans, evaluating technical and financial proposals from consultants, contracts – from $500,000 to over $5 million for the procurement of goods, works and services for World Bank financed projects in agriculture, irrigation, rural development and infrastructure projects. He has a master’s degree in water resources management and agricultural economics from Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA and a Bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering from Regional Engineering College, Durgapur, India.


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  • Promoting Equitable, Accountable, Civic Engagement in Myanmar (PEACE)

    PEACE Project Launch - November 2016 Promoting Equitable, Accountable, Civic Engagement in Myanmar (PEACE) enhances resources and strengthens the capacities of local CSOs for an empowered civil society in Myanmar that embraces diversity, promotes social inclusiveness, accountability, transparency, and civic responsibility.Through this EU-funded program, Helvetas - Myanmar, the Partnership for Transparency Fund e.V (PTFe.V.), and the Local Resource Centre (LRC) formed a consortium to support local Civil Society Organizations' participation and influence in the planning, implementation and review of development projects, services delivery and policies at national and sub-national levels for more inclusive and equitable development in Myanmar.This program has 3 primary goals:Strengthen the Local Resource Centre (LRC), a local CSO umbrella network, to be an accountable, inclusive, and professional service provider and coordination structure and enhance the networking among its peer networks and approximately 1000 local CSO member organizations;Support approximately 1000 local CSOs in strategic initiatives promoting community engagement and responsive local governance;Equip 500 local CSOs to participate in multi-stakeholder platforms, development projects and decision making with local authorities and public/private service providers for influencing policies and plans at national and sub-national levels.Year 1 will focus on strengthening the LRC and the group of national and regional trainers, in addition to launching the small grants mechanism. Year 2 will focus on operationalizing plans under the small grants mechanism. Year 3 will capitalize on experiences and intensify CSO engagement in national and sub-national multi-stakeholder platforms. Year 4 will document achievements and impacts of the action. In total the action will be implemented over 48 months.Program Location Program Partners Program Funder           European Union PTF Program Team Frank McNerneyProgram Adviser Read more × Frank McNerney Program Adviser Dr. McNerney is currently an independent consultant, who is working in various ways to improve higher education in developing countries. His particular areas of expertise are in finance and planning, public-private relationships, teacher training and the introduction of master’s level programs in education. Most recently, he consulted for the National University in Lesotho, where he analyzed regional tuition and fee structures in higher education institutions as well as university real estate investments. Prior to this position, he created and taught courses in education leadership, monitoring and evaluation at the Graduate School of Education at the American University in Cairo, and education policy and planning at Kabul Education University. Marie-Carin von GumppenbergProject Adviser Read more × Marie-Carin von Gumppenberg Project Adviser Marie-Carin von Gumppenberg, Council of Europe elections expert. She holds a PhD in political sciences and is a certified compliance officer. She has worked for 10 years for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) with duty stations in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Georgia and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. She has published several books on Central Asia and the Caucasus. Vinay BhargavaProject Adviser Read more × Vinay Bhargava Project Adviser Vinay served as the senior adviser for Public Sector Governance at the World Bank in 2006-7. From 2002-06 he was World Bank Director of International Affairs and Operations and was responsible for outreach to civil society organizations. Prior to that he was for six years the World Bank`s Resident Representative and Country Director for the Philippines. Vinay has over 25 years experience in economic development and donor assistance covering Asia, Africa, Middle East and Eastern Europe. He was the lead author of a report on Combating Corruption in the Philippines (2000) and on Challenging Corruption in Asia. He also contributed a chapter to the book The Many Faces of Corruption (2007). He has a PhD in agricultural economics. Fred TempleProject Manager, PEACE Read more × Fred Temple Project Manager, PEACE Frederick T. Temple is an American national educated at Yale (BA, Politics and Economics, 1968) and MIT (PhD, Political Science, 1973). He taught at the University of Nairobi in Kenya during 1972-73 and was a Senior Researcher at Abt Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, during 1974-76. After consulting assignments in Kenya, Tanzania and Ghana during 1974-76, he joined the staff of the World Bank in 1977. He worked on lending operations for 26 years, including assignments as Deputy Chief of the Bank’s Regional Mission in Bangkok, Chief of a division responsible at various times for energy, infrastructure and industry/trade/finance in Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka, Resident Representative in Turkey, and Country Director in Bangladesh, before serving as the Bank Group’s Ombudsman at the conclusion of his career. Since retiring in 2008, Mr. Temple has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, African Development Bank, and United Nations and volunteered as the program manager for the Nepal component of PTF’s CARTA program. He and his wife divide their time between Fairfax, Virginia, and Bangkok, Thailand. Jeff KassProject Adviser Read more × Jeff Kass Project Adviser Jeff has been a PTF member since April, 2011, serves on the PTF Management and Governance Committees and advises PTF projects in Africa and Asia. He is currently an independent consultant on strategy, governance and program evaluation. Prior to forming his consulting practice, he served as a corporate officer at International Paper Company, a large multi-national, in the following positions: Vice President and General Manager Hammermill Papers Division, and Vice President Strategic Planning and Vice President Sales for the printing sector. Jeff has an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BA in economics from Cornell University. Daniel RitchieProject Adviser Read more × Daniel Ritchie Project Adviser Daniel is an independent consultant on economic development. He served in the World Bank for almost 30 years before retiring in 1997. His positions included Director for North Africa and Iran, Director of the Asia Region Technical Department, Deputy Director, Personnel Department, Chief, India Country Operations, Chief, Agriculture and Rural Development, Southern Europe. He currently serves as President of a scholarship fund in Kenya, Board Member for a scholarship fund for girls in South Sudan, and Board Member of other NGOs. Dan holds a degree in public administration. Marie-Carin von GumppenbergPTF e.V. Member Read more × Marie-Carin von Gumppenberg PTF e.V. Member Marie-Carin von Gumppenberg is a Council of Europe elections expert. She holds a PhD in political sciences and is a certified compliance officer. She has worked for 10 years for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) with duty stations in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Georgia and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. She has published several books on Central Asia and the Caucasus. Ariel Shaker-BrownOperations Officer Read more × Ariel Shaker-Brown Operations Officer Ariel is the Operations Officer for the Partnership for Transparency Fund. Before joining PTF, Ariel was the Program Coordinator for the German Marshall Fund’s MENA Partnership for Democracy & Development in Tunis, Tunisia. Throughout her time at the German Marshall Fund, Ariel opened the Tunis regional office and provided on the ground support for all MENA program activities. Prior to her Tunis posting, Ariel supported the German Marshall Fund’s Foreign Policy program as program assistant in the Washington, DC headquarters. Ariel received her Bachelor’s Degree in Government with a minor in Arabic from the College of William and Mary. While at William and Mary, she spent 6 months studying at the University of Jordan in Amman.


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  • Guarding the Integrity of the Conditional Cash Transfer Program for the Philippines (i-Pantawid)

    Courtesy of the Global Partnership for Social Accountability Guarding the Integrity of the Conditional Cash Transfer Program (CCT) for the Philippines (i-Pantawid) aims to develop a model for civil society—government partnership for transparent and accountable implementation of the Patanwid Pamiliyang Pilipino Program. The project intends to strengthen the integrity of CCT Program by instituting a strong and sustained civil society role in program implementation that is characterized by (a) use of social accountability approaches in monitoring and evaluation, (b) transformation of beneficiary-parent leaders to community facilitators for change, and (c) training of household beneficiaries in active citizenship. By the end of the Project implementation period in March 2018, there should be a well functioning CSO-government collaboration in CCT Program in Northern Luzon that would serve as model for the rest of the country. In 2008, the Philippines’ Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) began a new CCT initiative to improve the education and health outcomes of poor households, entitled the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps). The initiative grew from covering 6,000 households in 2008 to four million in 2014. The 4Ps was designed to include partnerships with CSOs and activities geared towards involving beneficiary communities. However, the program activities failed to adequately empower communities to monitor the 4P and provide feedback to local health and education boards and the DSWD. In the Northern Luzon region, CSOs have limited knowledge and skills to develop and apply social accountability tools to monitor and channel beneficiary experiences and feedback to the DSW. Family Development Sessions (FDSs), community-based platforms for sharing information on the 4Ps and collecting community feedback, also face serious weaknesses. More specifically, parent leaders participating in the FDSs lack the necessary skills to mobilize communities, engage with local governments and service providers, and develop action plans to improve public services. The Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG), an NGO active in the social accountability arena in the for the last 25 years, was awarded a GPSA grant to strengthen CSO capacity in Northern Luzon to develop and apply SA tools to improve the 4Ps, and share lessons enabling replication of good practices across the country. This is being implemented via four components that are geared towards: tracking funds and monitoring CCT programs to ensure transparency;empowering citizens to use social accountability mechanisms and participate in district-level meetings with local authorities;strengthening the capacity of CSOs to organize and form a coalition that is active in the CCT program; andcollect and curate knowledge to improve project design and share lessons learned. Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) is managing the knowledge and learning (K&L) component of this program. PTF and its Filipino affiliate, PTFA, will apply its institutional experience and utilize its Advisers with wide and deep expertise to introduce global best practices and adapt them to local conditions and extract lessons from the project experiences by recording case studies, documenting best practices, and learning through monitoring and evaluation. The resulting knowledge will be shared globally to push the envelope on citizen-led good governance programing. PTF is also managing the K&L component of another GPSA supported project,Transparency and Accountability in Mongolian Education (TAME) with partner Globe International Center in Mongolia. News & Updates Practitioner Oriented Research Collaborations in Practice On May 19th, PTF joined the MIT Governance Lab (MIT Gov-Lab) and Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Governance (CCAGG) to share experiences surrounding a joint effort to encourage citizen monitoring of Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) Programs in the Philippines at the the annual GPSA Global Partners Forum. The CCT monitoring program leverages funding from […] Continue reading Using Citizen Engagement and Social Accountability Approaches in Mitigating Fraud, Errors and Corruption in Conditional Cash Transfer Programs On February 9, the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF), the Global Partnership for Social Accountability, and the Social Protection and Labor Global Practice at the World Bank held a discussion on “Using Citizen Engagement and Social Accountability Approaches in Mitigating Fraud, Errors and Corruption in Conditional Cash Transfer Programs,” with Dr. Vinay Bhargava, Chief Technical Adviser and Board member of PTF. Continue reading New Report Available on Citizen Engagement and Social Accountability in Conditional Cash Transfer Programs Conditional cash transfer programs (CCTPs) are widely used in the world and are proving effective in generating proven poverty alleviation impacts. However, CCTP achievements are undermined by fraud, errors, and corruption. These integrity risks and […] Continue reading Workshop: Enhancing Integrity of Conditional Cash Transfer Program (CCTP) in the Philippines PTF has prepared a report on international experiences and good practices in civil society participation and social accountability initiatives for enhancing integrity of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs (CCTPs). Findings and recommendations of the report will be shared and discussed at the “Enhancing Integrity of Conditional Cash Transfer Program (CCTP) in the Philippines” workshop on March 2-3. Continue reading Project Location Project Partners Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG)   The Affiliated Network for Social Accountability in East Asia and the Pacific (ANSA-EAP)   Responsible Citizens, Empowered Communities and Solidarity towards Social Change (RECITE)   PTF Project Team Imelda PerezEmy has been providing her services to PTFA as a Case Study Writer and Training/Workshop Facilitator and Documenter under the ADR RETA 6445 Project and the GPSA… × Team Members Imelda Perez Emy has been providing her services to PTFA as a Case Study Writer and Training/Workshop Facilitator and Documenter under the ADR RETA 6445 Project and the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. Trained as a social worker, her academic preparation and continuing exposure to issues and realities of people in communities has prepared her for the many years of development work. She has worked in various fields including refugee mental health program, sustainable development, mining governance, and social accountability. All these, while not within the framework of traditional social work, cover welfare and development issues, and are thus fields for development practice. Emy has been involved in programs as a manager, researcher, program coordinator and documenter. She works for ANSA EAP as Fellow for the Mainstreaming Social Accountability in the Extractive Industry which involved training and mentoring of partners in 4 target countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Timor Leste in doing social research, facilitating constructive engagement, and community monitoring. At the Ateneo School of Government, she managed a Mining Governance project and as part of the Environment Section of the School’s KPA (Knowledge Practice Area), she co-taught modules in environmental governance and shepherded some training of the Executive Education Program of the Ateneo School of Government. She also worked with Transparency International Philippines as Program Coordinator for Transparent Accountable Governance Project; as Project Director of Philippine Institute of Alternative Futures; and as Executive Coordinator for the Regional Secretariat of the National Councils for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific. In some occasions, she stretched her interest in training to teaching in classrooms and off-school sessions. Given a lot of chance, she would like to do a documentation of the lives women and children in small scale mining communities, of Filipina loom weavers, of mango pickers. Emy has a Master’s degree in Social Work from the Asian Social Institute in Manila. Hector Crisostomofinancial adviserBong provides accounting and financial management assistance to PTFA operations and PTF implemented projects in the Philippines, including ADB RETA 6445 and GPSA i-Pantawid Projects…. × Team Members Hector Crisostomo financial adviser Bong provides accounting and financial management assistance to PTFA operations and PTF implemented projects in the Philippines, including ADB RETA 6445 and GPSA i-Pantawid Projects. Bong is currently employed with Daallo Airlines in Somaliland. Before this international posting, Bong served as Finance Manager of Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc. (OIDCI), a Phil-based consulting company. For more than twenty years, he was in charge of the financial monitoring and budgeting and preparation of financial reports and statements of the company. He was responsible for cashflow management including monitoring of billings and collections, project contracting and project financial budget and management and ensuring compliance to government reportorial and submission requirements. A Certified Public Accountant, Bong holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Commerce Major in Accounting from De La Salle University in Manila. Roussam DiligOperations OfficerRoussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of… × Team Members Roussam Dilig Operations Officer Roussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of the Provincial Engagement Officers for the United States Department of Labor Project in reducing child labor in the sugarcane plantations in the Philippines in partnership with World Vision Philippines. Prior to his 6-month volunteer work in Sierra Leone as Business Centre Manager, Roussam led an Area Development Project in Bataan, Philippines which covered more than 3,000 children and families under Sponsorship Management, Economic Development and Organizational Development Program funded by World Vision Canada. Sam holds a Bachelor Degree in Industrial Engineering from the Technological Institute of the Philippines. Cesar B. Umali Jr.Project Operations and M&E SpecialistCesar serves as PTF’s M&E Specialist for WB GPSA i-Pantawid Project in the Philippines and TAME Project in Mongolia. Cesar is an Urban and Regional Planner with close to… × Team Members Cesar B. Umali Jr. Project Operations and M&E Specialist Cesar serves as PTF’s M&E Specialist for WB GPSA i-Pantawid Project in the Philippines and TAME Project in Mongolia. Cesar is an Urban and Regional Planner with close to 40 years of professional experience in rural-urban economic development, evidence-based management of multi-component projects, and theory of change-based monitoring and evaluation in the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Myanmar, Fiji, Mongolia, Ghana, Bangladesh, and the United States. He has worked with numerous central government agencies, local government institutions, and NGOs/ CSOs on community-driven development; capacity-building and education; institutional strengthening; local governance/ decentralization and local revenue/ resource generation; social accountability and constructive engagement with communities; climate change and environment; infrastructure planning and maintenance; livelihood development; public-private partnerships; poverty studies; and gender and development. Mr. Umali has been engaged on various projects funded by USAID, World Bank, ADB, KfW, UNDP, FAO, CIDA, European Union, U.N. ESCAP, GIZ, AusAid, and Multi-Donor Fund for Aceh. He is a licensed environmental planner, with an M.A. in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of the Philippines, where he was lecturer from 1987-1993. He completed the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s one-year Special Program on Urban and Regional Studies in Developing Areas. He has published books and articles on rural/ regional development. Dante de los AngelesProject Coordinator and K&L Adviser Dante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012)… × Team Members Dante de los Angeles Project Coordinator and K&L Adviser Dante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012) and Regional Coordinator for East Asia (2012 to present). He is a member of the Board of Directors of Resources, Environment and Economics Center for Studies, Inc., a Philippine based action-research private organization that specializes in the economics of natural resource and environmental management including accounting for natural capital and ecosystem services. He was also former CEO of the Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc., a leading Filipino consulting firm, where he championed the use of holistic project approach that weaves into the core element of projects the concerns of economic/social development, governance, and environment security (or EDGE Approach) to create impacts that maximize the long-term sustainability of projects. Dante has more than 30 years of public and private sectors experience in rural and institutional development, particularly in planning, procurement and oversight for good governance of foreign-assisted projects on governance and decentralization, integrated area development, natural resources and environmental management, institution and capacity building, and the empowerment of communities for sustainable development. Implemented mostly in the complex conditions of underdevelopment and armed conflict, these initiatives received funding from USAID, AusAID, CIDA, JICA, WB, ADB, JBIC, and the EU. He served in various government positions before joining the private sector in 1992. He assisted in the organization and leadership of the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Rural Workers, an agency dedicated to promoting the welfare of millions of Philippine landless rural workers. He subsequently joined the National Council for Integrated Area Development of the Office of the Prime Minister to help manage a 7-year integrated area development project funded by the Australian Government involving 19 national and provincial agencies that collaborated for the development of Zamboanga del Sur, one of the poorest Muslim provinces in Mindanao. In a concurrent capacity, he served as Deputy Staff Director of the Local Affairs Office in charge of reviewing, monitoring and evaluating government policies on decentralizing programs to the regions and local government units. Dante has a Master of Management degree from the Asian Institute of Management, Philippines, and undertook post graduate courses at the School of Economics, University of the Philippines.


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  • Strengthening Citizens Involvement in Mitigating Governance Risks in Local Government Units in the Philippines

    Strengthening Citizens Involvement in Mitigating Governance Risks in Local Government Units in the Philippines provided technical assistance to support more effective citizen engagement in the formulation and execution of budgets and procurement processes at the local level. Five sub-projects were developed to address governance risks unique to Local Government Units (LGUs) in the Caraga Region in Northeastern Mindanao. Insights gained from this pilot will feed into a series of reforms undertaken by the Government of the Philippines, including the Bottom Up Budgeting and Open Data disclosure. The Challenge Our Strategy The Result Lessons Learned The Philippines is characterized by high corruption risks that, left unmitigated, pose risks to the country’s development. The challenge, particularly in terms of procurement and financial management, is a major factor linked with the country’s low competitiveness rating and low elasticity of poverty to economic growth. Local CSO and citizen participation can have a major impact on improving governance by shining a light on these processes to increase transparency and accountability where the national government has limited oversight. However, capacity constraints on the part of civil society and a lack of awareness on the part of Local Governance Units (LGUs) on the benefits of citizen participation in governance risk mitigation measures, promulgated fruitful engagements. A diverse range of CSOs and LGUs were selected through an open-call for proposals to implement the sub-projects. Workshops and trainings in project development and social accountability tools and methodologies were imparted to participating LGUs and CSOs. Awareness raising campaigns and well-defined models of citizen engagement were set-up to address governance risks pertaining to each participating LGU. A Project Steering Committee consisting of relevant stakeholders, including representatives of national and local governments, civil society, and technical expertise under PTF was formed to guide the implementation processes. Project Operating Guidelines were prepared and approved by this committee.Given the nascent involvement of local CSOs in social accountability and governance reform work in the area, much of the project’s time and resources were used to strengthen the capacity of CSOs, engender a network for knowledge sharing, and develop partnerships with LGUs. The capacity of local CSOs participating in the sub-projects varied a great deal and so did their familiarity with social accountability tools. PTF guided mentoring support to CSO grantees resulted in proposals with stronger approaches. Also, collaborative learning activities involving both community members and barangay/local officials created “shared space” for discussing and ironing out existing problems in citizen government relationships, resulting in improved relationships between citizens and government. A variety of citizen engagement models demonstrated success through the course of the program: Sub-grantee capacity building. Through PTF-guided learning and training activities, the participant CSOs and LGUs in the five regions have become more familiar with social accountability tools and methodologies for governance risks mitigation measures. This familiarity has contributed to an enabling environment for fruitful engagement. Community mobilization. Community mobilization efforts and processes have increased awareness and participation of citizens with the local government units. Hundreds of citizens have become engaged with local government in the participating LGUs. A variety of citizen engagement models have emerged in the course of the project, which can be adapted to any governance concerns at the LGU level. Toolkits, templates and operational guidelines. Developing these materials not only provides a framework for engagement, but provides a basis for scale up and replication in existing work e.g., proposal development, learning workshops and partnership building. Constructive government-civil society partnerships. An increased level of participation from local government officials has been observed in the sub-projects target districts. In PTF’s experience, social accountability produces better results when there is a constructive engagement between civil society and government. As noted in the program evaluation report, an additional investment is required to realize the full operation and sustainability of the piloted citizen engagement processes, especially at the implementation level. Even so, a variety of citizen engagement models that proved successful through the course of the program may be adapted to address a wide variety of governance concerns at the local level, including budget formation and procurement. The following lessons have been learned through the pilot program to inform future scale-up: Technical and financial support should go hand-in hand. Mentoring support to CSO grantees (e.g. Project Development Workshop) resulted in proposals with stronger social accountability approaches. Working at the community level takes a considerable amount of time. More open-ended and flexible support can spell the difference between success and failure. Constructive engagement takes practice. Collaborative learning activities resulted in participatory governance and improved relationship between citizens and their government. Traditional and non-traditional CSO partnership offered different kinds of professional expertise. Xavier University handled deftly navigated various obstacles surfaced by complex local politics. Knowledge and experience in social accountability matters. Involving CSO with no prior experience with social accountability prove serious risks. Sub-Projects Strengthening Capacities of Duty Bearers and Empowering Rural Women and Children Against Gender-Based Violence CSO: PhilDHRRA-Mindanao The objective of this sub-project was to reduce incidence of Gender-Based Violence in the Province of Agusan del Norte by strengthening capacities of “duty bearers” and empowering women and children “rights holders”. A community-based support system was created through this sub-project and extensive training activities were imparted at both government administrative and citizen level to gain knowledge and skills concerning gender sensitivity, leadership, advocacy, planning, budgeting and monitoring and human rights laws. Learn More Assessment of the Implementation of Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) in the Municipality of Nasipit and Involvement of Stakeholders in BUB Livelihood Project for Food Security and Self-sufficiency CSO: Culit Multi-Purpose Cooperative This sub-project aimed to establish a mechanism towards mainstreaming the Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) beneficiaries into the socio-economic development of the municipality’ by linking the CCT program with an expanded Bottoms-Up Budgeting program where the CCT beneficiaries would have opportunity to participate in the identification and budgeting of community anti-poverty projects. Learn More Piloting the DBM Handbook on Civil Society Organization’s Participation in the Budgeting Process thru a Tripartite Approach in Participatory Governance in Surigao City CSO: Surigao Economic Development Foundation This sub-project sought to make the Philippines Department of Budget and Management’s Handbook on Civil Society Organizations Participation in the Budgeting Process more accessible to citizens by transforming it into an illustrated (comics format) version. The handbook served as practical guide for local government and CSOs/citizen collaboration in the preparation of the local government budget in Surigao City. Learn More Developing and Strengthening Capacities of Local Government Unit and Citizens Groups Towards Institutionalization of a Joint LGU-CSO/PVO Monitoring and Evaluation System for National Government Programs and Projects CSO: PhilDHRRA Mindanao This project sought to mobilize, organize, and strengthen the capacities of Turbod municipality’s volunteer citizens groups to monitor and report on the implementation of government-funded infrastructure projects. The project institutionalized a mechanism that adopted transparency and accountability measures in the implementation of national government programs and projects while developing and strengthening the capacities of LGU and Volunteer Citizens Groups towards institutionalization of a local-based M&E system. Learn More Providing Social Accountability Interventions to Foster Constructive Engagement of Stakeholders in Local Government Affairs of Cagayan de Oro CSO: Xavier University This sub-grant consolidated and strengthened various CSO initiatives in Cagayan de Oro to engage the Local Government in transparent and participatory governance of the city through a citizen-led “People’s Council.” The Council and common People’s Development Agenda were developed to increase citizen participation in monitoring of and contributing to political activities and election processes. As a result, the People’s Council secured a role in budget deliberations of the city counsel and obtained a seat in the Finance Committee in charge of formulating the Executive Department budget. Learn More Program Location Program Team Roussam DiligOperations OfficerRoussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of… × Team Members Roussam Dilig Operations Officer Roussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of the Provincial Engagement Officers for the United States Department of Labor Project in reducing child labor in the sugarcane plantations in the Philippines in partnership with World Vision Philippines. Prior to his 6-month volunteer work in Sierra Leone as Business Centre Manager, Roussam led an Area Development Project in Bataan, Philippines which covered more than 3,000 children and families under Sponsorship Management, Economic Development and Organizational Development Program funded by World Vision Canada. Sam holds a Bachelor Degree in Industrial Engineering from the Technological Institute of the Philippines. Geert van der LindenGerry served as member of the Board of Directors of the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) from 2006 – 2015. Since 2015 he is President of the Partnership… × Team Members Geert van der Linden Gerry served as member of the Board of Directors of the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) from 2006 – 2015. Since 2015 he is President of the Partnership for Transparency Fund Asia (PTFA). Gerry has over 30 years of professional experience covering all facets of international development banking: political, economic and sector analysis, project design and implementation, policy and strategy work and risk management. Prior to his retirement at the Asian Development Bank (ADB) where he worked for 27 year, he was Vice President of Knowledge Management and Sustainable Development Department. Earlier, he held other senior management positions such as Director General of the East and Central Asia Department; Director of Programs Department (East and Central Asia); Director of Programs Department (West Asia) and Chief of Office of Pacific Operations. This provided him the opportunity to travel and gained in-depth knowledge of over 30 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Gerry is also an active member of the Board of Trustees of Lifebank Foundation, a Phil-based micro-finance NGO (since 2007); and a  Member of the Board of Directors of Goldilocks Bakeshop since 2012. He also served on the Board of Directors of Planters Development Bank in Manila from 2009 to 2014 and was an Associate Professor at the Asian Institute of Management, where he taught a course on governance and development at Master’s level from 2010 to 2012. Gerry has a Master’s degree in Economics from Erasmus University in Rotterdam (1972) and completed the Harvard Business School Executive Development Program in 1997. Dante de los AngelesDante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012)… × Team Members Dante de los Angeles Dante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012) and Regional Coordinator for East Asia (2012 to present). He is a member of the Board of Directors of Resources, Environment and Economics Center for Studies, Inc., a Philippine based action-research private organization that specializes in the economics of natural resource and environmental management including accounting for natural capital and ecosystem services. He was also former CEO of the Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc., a leading Filipino consulting firm, where he championed the use of holistic project approach that weaves into the core element of projects the concerns of economic/social development, governance, and environment security (or EDGE Approach) to create impacts that maximize the long-term sustainability of projects. Dante has more than 30 years of public and private sectors experience in rural and institutional development, particularly in planning, procurement and oversight for good governance of foreign-assisted projects on governance and decentralization, integrated area development, natural resources and environmental management, institution and capacity building, and the empowerment of communities for sustainable development. Implemented mostly in the complex conditions of underdevelopment and armed conflict, these initiatives received funding from USAID, AusAID, CIDA, JICA, WB, ADB, JBIC, and the EU. He served in various government positions before joining the private sector in 1992. He assisted in the organization and leadership of the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Rural Workers, an agency dedicated to promoting the welfare of millions of Philippine landless rural workers. He subsequently joined the National Council for Integrated Area Development of the Office of the Prime Minister to help manage a 7-year integrated area development project funded by the Australian Government involving 19 national and provincial agencies that collaborated for the development of Zamboanga del Sur, one of the poorest Muslim provinces in Mindanao. In a concurrent capacity, he served as Deputy Staff Director of the Local Affairs Office in charge of reviewing, monitoring and evaluating government policies on decentralizing programs to the regions and local government units. Dante has a Master of Management degree from the Asian Institute of Management, Philippines, and undertook post graduate courses at the School of Economics, University of the Philippines. Hector Crisostomofinancial adviserBong provides accounting and financial management assistance to PTFA operations and PTF implemented projects in the Philippines, including ADB RETA 6445 and GPSA i-Pantawid Projects…. × Team Members Hector Crisostomo financial adviser Bong provides accounting and financial management assistance to PTFA operations and PTF implemented projects in the Philippines, including ADB RETA 6445 and GPSA i-Pantawid Projects. Bong is currently employed with Daallo Airlines in Somaliland. Before this international posting, Bong served as Finance Manager of Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc. (OIDCI), a Phil-based consulting company. For more than twenty years, he was in charge of the financial monitoring and budgeting and preparation of financial reports and statements of the company. He was responsible for cashflow management including monitoring of billings and collections, project contracting and project financial budget and management and ensuring compliance to government reportorial and submission requirements. A Certified Public Accountant, Bong holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Commerce Major in Accounting from De La Salle University in Manila. Imelda PerezEmy has been providing her services to PTFA as a Case Study Writer and Training/Workshop Facilitator and Documenter under the ADR RETA 6445 Project and the GPSA… × Team Members Imelda Perez Emy has been providing her services to PTFA as a Case Study Writer and Training/Workshop Facilitator and Documenter under the ADR RETA 6445 Project and the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. Trained as a social worker, her academic preparation and continuing exposure to issues and realities of people in communities has prepared her for the many years of development work. She has worked in various fields including refugee mental health program, sustainable development, mining governance, and social accountability. All these, while not within the framework of traditional social work, cover welfare and development issues, and are thus fields for development practice. Emy has been involved in programs as a manager, researcher, program coordinator and documenter. She works for ANSA EAP as Fellow for the Mainstreaming Social Accountability in the Extractive Industry which involved training and mentoring of partners in 4 target countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Timor Leste in doing social research, facilitating constructive engagement, and community monitoring. At the Ateneo School of Government, she managed a Mining Governance project and as part of the Environment Section of the School’s KPA (Knowledge Practice Area), she co-taught modules in environmental governance and shepherded some training of the Executive Education Program of the Ateneo School of Government. She also worked with Transparency International Philippines as Program Coordinator for Transparent Accountable Governance Project; as Project Director of Philippine Institute of Alternative Futures; and as Executive Coordinator for the Regional Secretariat of the National Councils for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific. In some occasions, she stretched her interest in training to teaching in classrooms and off-school sessions. Given a lot of chance, she would like to do a documentation of the lives women and children in small scale mining communities, of Filipina loom weavers, of mango pickers. Emy has a Master’s degree in Social Work from the Asian Social Institute in Manila. Program Documents Program Completion Report (215 kB) Program Operating Guidelines (873 kB) Publication Report (637 KB) Case Studies on Gender & Governance and Exacting Social Accountability (637 KB)


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  • Enhancing the Impact of Citizen-Led Transparency Initiatives for Good Governance

    Enhancing the Impact of Citizen-Led Transparency Initiatives for Good Governance was a program to pilot citizen monitoring of government programs at the local level that could be adopted to enhance the implementation of national programs. This was achieved through: a) grant funding to selected CSOs to pilot social accountability approaches and b) mechanisms developed to facilitate cross-learning and build a shared good governance agenda between stakeholders. THE CHALLENGE OUR STRATEGY THE RESULTS Lessons Learned Corruption in the Philippines is pervasive and deep-rooted, touching all parts of society. It ranges from petty corruption that citizens encounter frequently when applying for a permit or license to state capture siphoning huge sums of money. Citizen movements against corruption in the majority of PTF-supported countries, including the Phillipines, are fragmented - ranging from highly professional CSOs in large urban centers to tiny initiatives supported by local churches or NGOs scattered across the country. This fragmentation leads to uneven and inconsistent progress on reducing the impact of corruption and poor governance over the long term. A huge opportunity lies in strengthening the intermediary role of networks to scale local efforts to achieve larger-scale impact and sustainability. In 2012, PTF partnered with ANSA-EAP and the Coalition Against Corruption of the Makati Business Club (MBC-CAC) to implement the Australian Aid funded program in two regions - Northern Luzon and Northeastern Mindanao. MBC-CAC led the selection of three sub-projects to implement pilot programs on citizen engagement in the Conditional Cash Transfer program of the Philippine government (RECITE in Mangaldan, Pangasinan), and on citizen engagement with local government (KARSA in Tabuk, Kalinga, and CCAGG in Penarrubia, Abra). ANSA-EAP developed training and capacity building programs, provided technical advice, conducted knowledge-sharing workshops, and prepared of a number of knowledge products around the lessons learned through the program. ANSA-EAP also led the creation of a knowledge consortium to bring together CSOs working in social accountability.Three primary impacts were observed through the implementation of the program: greater sub-grantee capacity;increased community level mobilization; andmore positive and productive interactions with government officials. CSOs have become more familiar with social accountability tools had the opportunity to put lessons learned immediately into practice. Likewise, citizen capacity for social accountability activities was built through training, association building, program development and opportunities to engage in practice. Local government responses varied a great deal with some authorities welcoming citizen engagement and others actively resisting it. Overall, however, the experience in the sub-projects was positive, creating the atmosphere for constructive engagement and demonstrating what can be achieved through it. Some innovations were also introduced to share the knowledge gained through the program, principally: the introduction of a new website (http://citizensengage.info/) to provide resource material to CSOs planning to engage in social accountability;the creation of a knowledge consortium that brings together the major CSOs in social accountability; anda bloggers event using social media to support social accountability. Impacts of each sub-project are detailed in the sub-project webpages below.Several important lessons were gained through the implementation of the program: Technical and financial support should go hand-in-hand in project design and implementation phases. The capacity of local CSOs varies a great deal as does their familiarity with social accountability tools. Mentoring support to target CSO grantees and communicating comments during the subproject design stage resulted in proposals with stronger and more context-suitable social accountability approaches. Working at the community level often takes more time than planned. Changing the mind of local officials who do not welcome civil society participation in local affairs is sometimes not possible, and always takes time. The general experience of the sub-project grantees, however, points to the huge potential in terms of getting people actively involved in governance and social accountability work. Give priority to funding projects that pursue scaling-up objectives, rather than reach. A clear example is the rural road monitoring sub-project implemented by PAKISAMA. There must be hundreds of similar farm-to-market roads being implemented each year around the country. There is clearly much scope for scale-up. However, it would require extensive engagement with the Department of Agriculture to make social accountability a standard feature of its rural roads program and the financial resources for doing so are currently not available, rendering the prospects of successful scale up small. Partnership building and strategic planning workshops are critical and result in (a) more in-depth assessment of the local social accountability contexts and organizational and technical capacities of target grantees, (b) learning/sharing of monitoring initiatives at the local level from other groups that participated in the events, and (c) leveling off on the overall results framework of the program. Collaboration with grantees in the design and conduct of inception meetings ensured that all stakeholders (grantees’, volunteers, and local partners) were oriented on their respective sub-projects and their roles as social accountability actors. These one-day, field-based meetings also provided venues for contact building with local government officials and frontline service providers who were identified as critical partners or actors under the grantees’ planned interventions. Sub-Projects Building Citizens’ Capacity to Monitor Road Projects CSO: PAKISAMA-Mindanao This sub-project trained citizens to monitor the implementation of Farm to Market Road (FMR) projects in the provinces of Veruela, Agusan Del Norte and Agusan Del Sur. The goal was to build the capacity of ordinary citizens to effectively monitor government road construction projects and thereby creating “demand” for quality construction and on-time completion of these infrastructure projects. Learn More Citizen Watchdogs for Good Governance CSO: Foundation for Growth Organizational Upliftment of People (GROUP) This sub-project aimed to solve problems within the Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) Program in the Philippines through a better understanding of ‘benefit gaps’ in the program and its impact on reducing poverty. Activities employed included the signing of memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the different partner agencies, passing of a resolution, focus group discussions with the different stakeholders, capacity-building sessions with the monitoring and research volunteers and public presentations. The sub-project produced a report detailing beneficiary concerns with the program and, where possible, findings to back up their claims. Learn More Applied Social Accountability at the Community Level CSO: recite This sub-project developed a mechanism for citizens to promote greater transparency and accountability for more efficient and effective service delivery and community development initiatives undertaken under the Philippines Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) Program. Selected Parent Leaders of the CCT program were trained on social accountability approaches and guided on their application to monitor health service delivery and the selection of local leaders. The trained Parent Leaders provided a core group of active citizens with the skills, knowledge and confidence to pursue social accountability and continue to grow the practice at the community level. Learn More Enhancing the Impact of Citizen-Led Transparency Initiatives for Good Governance CSO: Young Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (YCCAGG) This sub-project aimed to increase transparency and accountability in local governance by empowering citizens, building the capacity of officials to partner with their people, and encouraging the local governments to form Development Councils with CSO members. Learn More Strengthening Local Capacities in Good Governance CSO: Kalinga Apayao Religious Sector Association (KARSA) This sub-project aimed to start citizen engagement activities in five barangays of Tabuk City by establishing barangay monitoring teams and hosting a series of of trainings and seminar workshops for the newly created monitoring teams, barangay government officials and the general public. Learn More Project Location   Project Team Geert van der LindenGerry served as member of the Board of Directors of the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) from 2006 – 2015. Since 2015 he is President of the Partnership… × Team Members Geert van der Linden Gerry served as member of the Board of Directors of the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) from 2006 – 2015. Since 2015 he is President of the Partnership for Transparency Fund Asia (PTFA). Gerry has over 30 years of professional experience covering all facets of international development banking: political, economic and sector analysis, project design and implementation, policy and strategy work and risk management. Prior to his retirement at the Asian Development Bank (ADB) where he worked for 27 year, he was Vice President of Knowledge Management and Sustainable Development Department. Earlier, he held other senior management positions such as Director General of the East and Central Asia Department; Director of Programs Department (East and Central Asia); Director of Programs Department (West Asia) and Chief of Office of Pacific Operations. This provided him the opportunity to travel and gained in-depth knowledge of over 30 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Gerry is also an active member of the Board of Trustees of Lifebank Foundation, a Phil-based micro-finance NGO (since 2007); and a  Member of the Board of Directors of Goldilocks Bakeshop since 2012. He also served on the Board of Directors of Planters Development Bank in Manila from 2009 to 2014 and was an Associate Professor at the Asian Institute of Management, where he taught a course on governance and development at Master’s level from 2010 to 2012. Gerry has a Master’s degree in Economics from Erasmus University in Rotterdam (1972) and completed the Harvard Business School Executive Development Program in 1997. Dante de los AngelesDante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012)… × Team Members Dante de los Angeles Dante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012) and Regional Coordinator for East Asia (2012 to present). He is a member of the Board of Directors of Resources, Environment and Economics Center for Studies, Inc., a Philippine based action-research private organization that specializes in the economics of natural resource and environmental management including accounting for natural capital and ecosystem services. He was also former CEO of the Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc., a leading Filipino consulting firm, where he championed the use of holistic project approach that weaves into the core element of projects the concerns of economic/social development, governance, and environment security (or EDGE Approach) to create impacts that maximize the long-term sustainability of projects. Dante has more than 30 years of public and private sectors experience in rural and institutional development, particularly in planning, procurement and oversight for good governance of foreign-assisted projects on governance and decentralization, integrated area development, natural resources and environmental management, institution and capacity building, and the empowerment of communities for sustainable development. Implemented mostly in the complex conditions of underdevelopment and armed conflict, these initiatives received funding from USAID, AusAID, CIDA, JICA, WB, ADB, JBIC, and the EU. He served in various government positions before joining the private sector in 1992. He assisted in the organization and leadership of the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Rural Workers, an agency dedicated to promoting the welfare of millions of Philippine landless rural workers. He subsequently joined the National Council for Integrated Area Development of the Office of the Prime Minister to help manage a 7-year integrated area development project funded by the Australian Government involving 19 national and provincial agencies that collaborated for the development of Zamboanga del Sur, one of the poorest Muslim provinces in Mindanao. In a concurrent capacity, he served as Deputy Staff Director of the Local Affairs Office in charge of reviewing, monitoring and evaluating government policies on decentralizing programs to the regions and local government units. Dante has a Master of Management degree from the Asian Institute of Management, Philippines, and undertook post graduate courses at the School of Economics, University of the Philippines. Roussam DiligOperations OfficerRoussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of… × Team Members Roussam Dilig Operations Officer Roussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of the Provincial Engagement Officers for the United States Department of Labor Project in reducing child labor in the sugarcane plantations in the Philippines in partnership with World Vision Philippines. Prior to his 6-month volunteer work in Sierra Leone as Business Centre Manager, Roussam led an Area Development Project in Bataan, Philippines which covered more than 3,000 children and families under Sponsorship Management, Economic Development and Organizational Development Program funded by World Vision Canada. Sam holds a Bachelor Degree in Industrial Engineering from the Technological Institute of the Philippines. Project Documents Citizen Monitoring Through Community Scorecards Learning Brief (3.1 MB) Learning for Local Participatory Planning and Budgeting Learning Brief (2.9 MB) Capturing and Communicating Lessons from Social Accountability Initiatives Learning Brief (3.1 MB) MIDTERM REPORT Sep 2012 – Dec 2013 (426 KB) Strategic Planning Workshop Report (78 KB) Project Completion Report(283 KB) Videos Citizens' watchdog for good governance Building Citizens' Capacity on Road Projects Youth takes on participatory governance From Faith to Participatory Governance "Facilitators of Change" more than CCT beneficiaries the state of social media Potency of social media platforms Limitations of social media News & Updates Enhancing the Impact of Citizen - Led Transparency Initiatives for Good Governance Project January 22, 2013 – A new collaboration is putting learning-based approaches squarely at the forefront of efforts to help sustain social accountability initiatives on the ground[…] Partners launch projects with stakeholders’ meeting August 8, 2013 – Three member organizations of the Northern Luzon Coalition for Good Governance (NLCGG) conducted separate stakeholders’ meetings to launch their social accountability […] Civil Society Training on Community Scorecards August 8, 2013 – ANSA–EAP trained civil society organizations (CSOs) facilitating and using Community Scorecards (CSC) as a tool for citizen monitoring of local health services […]


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  • Transparency and Accountability in Mongolia Education (TAME)

      Transparency and Accountability in Mongolia Education (TAME) addresses the development challenge of providing disadvantaged ethnic minorities of Mongolia access to better education services. The Project intends to achieve this overarching objective by increasing efficiency, transparency and accountability in education procurement, organizing a Parent Teacher Association in each project soum, and promoting civic society participation in prioritizing educational initiative. The education reforms are expected to directly benefit 90% of Mongolia’s ethnic minorities who will have better access to quality education by the end of the project. In recent years, Mongolia has become one of the fastest growing economies in Asia. However, there are serious challenges, particularly in the education sector, that need to be addressed before the country can be on a sustainable economic growth path. Educational outcomes need to be improved across the board in order to prepare students with critical skills to effectively participate in the labor market. Rural areas are especially disadvantaged and suffer from disparities in access to education, particularly in geographically isolated regions. Furthermore, relevant government authorities have limited data available on education performance and budgets from provincial and district levels. Globe International Center, an organization with close to 20 years of experience working on governance issues, has been awarded a GPSA grant to improve the quality of service delivery in the education sector by strengthening citizen engagement in the monitoring of budgets and procurement processes in order to ensure transparency and accountability. More specifically, this will be done by: forming Parent Teacher Associations (PTAs) and training them to apply social accountability tools to monitor school performance at the district level;strengthening the capacity of CSOs and media to monitor budgets and procurement processes in the education sector in eight targeted provinces; andcapturing knowledge from implementation and lessons learned to inform education reform in Mongolia and other countries around the world. The Partnership for Transparency Fund is managing the knowledge and learning (K&L) component of this project and another GPSA supported project, i-Pantawid with partner Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG) in the Philippines. PTF and PTFA will apply their institutional experience and utilize their Advisers with wide and deep expertise to introduce global best practices and adapt them to local conditions and extract lessons from the project experiences by recording case studies, documenting best practices, and learning through monitoring and evaluation. The resulting knowledge will be shared globally to push the envelope on citizen-led good governance programing. News & Updates Education project by PTF’s Mongolian partner, Globe International, becomes GPSA finalist The World Bank supported Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA) has selected eight final development projects proposed by civil society organizations from a total of 428 proposals that were made. One of the accepted projects, which will now be subject to a GPSA due diligence review, is from the Partnership for Transparency Fund’s partner in […] Continue reading Project Location Project Partner   GLOBE INTERNTIONAL PTF Project Team Roussam DiligOperations OfficerRoussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of… × Team Members Roussam Dilig Operations Officer Roussam joined the Philippines-based PTF Asia in April 2015 as Senior Operations Officer with main focus on the GPSA i-Pantawid Project. He used to be one of the Provincial Engagement Officers for the United States Department of Labor Project in reducing child labor in the sugarcane plantations in the Philippines in partnership with World Vision Philippines. Prior to his 6-month volunteer work in Sierra Leone as Business Centre Manager, Roussam led an Area Development Project in Bataan, Philippines which covered more than 3,000 children and families under Sponsorship Management, Economic Development and Organizational Development Program funded by World Vision Canada. Sam holds a Bachelor Degree in Industrial Engineering from the Technological Institute of the Philippines. Cesar B. Umali Jr.Project Operations and M&E SpecialistCesar serves as PTF’s M&E Specialist for WB GPSA i-Pantawid Project in the Philippines and TAME Project in Mongolia. Cesar is an Urban and Regional Planner with close to… × Team Members Cesar B. Umali Jr. Project Operations and M&E Specialist Cesar serves as PTF’s M&E Specialist for WB GPSA i-Pantawid Project in the Philippines and TAME Project in Mongolia. Cesar is an Urban and Regional Planner with close to 40 years of professional experience in rural-urban economic development, evidence-based management of multi-component projects, and theory of change-based monitoring and evaluation in the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, Myanmar, Fiji, Mongolia, Ghana, Bangladesh, and the United States. He has worked with numerous central government agencies, local government institutions, and NGOs/ CSOs on community-driven development; capacity-building and education; institutional strengthening; local governance/ decentralization and local revenue/ resource generation; social accountability and constructive engagement with communities; climate change and environment; infrastructure planning and maintenance; livelihood development; public-private partnerships; poverty studies; and gender and development. Mr. Umali has been engaged on various projects funded by USAID, World Bank, ADB, KfW, UNDP, FAO, CIDA, European Union, U.N. ESCAP, GIZ, AusAid, and Multi-Donor Fund for Aceh. He is a licensed environmental planner, with an M.A. in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of the Philippines, where he was lecturer from 1987-1993. He completed the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s one-year Special Program on Urban and Regional Studies in Developing Areas. He has published books and articles on rural/ regional development. Vinay Bhargavaproject managerVinay served as the senior adviser for Public Sector Governance at the World Bank in 2006-7. From 2002-06 he was World Bank Director of International Affairs and Operations and… × Team Members Vinay Bhargava project manager Vinay served as the senior adviser for Public Sector Governance at the World Bank in 2006-7. From 2002-06 he was World Bank Director of International Affairs and Operations and was responsible for outreach to civil society organizations. Prior to that he was for six years the World Bank`s Resident Representative and Country Director for the Philippines. Vinay has over 25 years experience in economic development and donor assistance covering Asia, Africa, Middle East and Eastern Europe. He was the lead author of a report on Combating Corruption in the Philippines (2000) and on Challenging Corruption in Asia. He also contributed a chapter to the book The Many Faces of Corruption (2007). He has a PhD in agricultural economics. Dante de los AngelesProject Coordinator and K&L Adviser Dante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012)… × Team Members Dante de los Angeles Project Coordinator and K&L Adviser Dante serves as PTF Adviser since 2010 and currently as PTFA Secretary/Treasurer. He was PTF Board Member from 2011 to 2015 and Regional Coordinator for Africa (2011 to 2012) and Regional Coordinator for East Asia (2012 to present). He is a member of the Board of Directors of Resources, Environment and Economics Center for Studies, Inc., a Philippine based action-research private organization that specializes in the economics of natural resource and environmental management including accounting for natural capital and ecosystem services. He was also former CEO of the Orient Integrated Development Consultants, Inc., a leading Filipino consulting firm, where he championed the use of holistic project approach that weaves into the core element of projects the concerns of economic/social development, governance, and environment security (or EDGE Approach) to create impacts that maximize the long-term sustainability of projects. Dante has more than 30 years of public and private sectors experience in rural and institutional development, particularly in planning, procurement and oversight for good governance of foreign-assisted projects on governance and decentralization, integrated area development, natural resources and environmental management, institution and capacity building, and the empowerment of communities for sustainable development. Implemented mostly in the complex conditions of underdevelopment and armed conflict, these initiatives received funding from USAID, AusAID, CIDA, JICA, WB, ADB, JBIC, and the EU. He served in various government positions before joining the private sector in 1992. He assisted in the organization and leadership of the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Rural Workers, an agency dedicated to promoting the welfare of millions of Philippine landless rural workers. He subsequently joined the National Council for Integrated Area Development of the Office of the Prime Minister to help manage a 7-year integrated area development project funded by the Australian Government involving 19 national and provincial agencies that collaborated for the development of Zamboanga del Sur, one of the poorest Muslim provinces in Mindanao. In a concurrent capacity, he served as Deputy Staff Director of the Local Affairs Office in charge of reviewing, monitoring and evaluating government policies on decentralizing programs to the regions and local government units. Dante has a Master of Management degree from the Asian Institute of Management, Philippines, and undertook post graduate courses at the School of Economics, University of the Philippines. Eluned SchweitzerEducation Specialist and Social Accountability Adviser × Team Members Eluned Schweitzer Education Specialist and Social Accountability Adviser Project Documents Progress Report   (october 2016) Project Photos


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  • The Barry Metzger Rule of Law Initiative

    Legal Response to Gender Based Violence Training - Macedonia 2016   download the program flyer (701 kB) Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) founder Barry Metzger worked tirelessly to promote justice in some of the world’s poorest countries. The “Rule of Law Initiative” bearing his name is designed to respect the humanitarian and legal values that Mr. Metzger promoted throughout his life as General Counsel of the Asian Development Bank, a distinguished lawyer in private practice and Board Member of PTF. Everyday, tens of millions of poor people in developing countries face extortion that violates their dignity. Barry Metzger was quietly driven to volunteer with PTF, as are the Advisers that continue his work, because he understood these devastating impacts were in large part a result of weak rule-of-law. The ambition behind the Barry Metzger Rule of Law Initiative is to contribute to the development of more transparent and predictable government institutions. The video below outlines the Metzger Initiative's launch and initial projects Through the Metzger Initiative, PTF supports citizen-led action in developing countries to make governments transparent, accountable and free of corruption by strengthening civil society institutions and developing the next generation of leaders advancing good governance and rule-of-law. The Initiative supports three types of activities:   Grant Making: Supporting projects that address specific issues related to the rule of law such as freedom of information, conflict of interest, and judicial reform. Knowledge Sharing: Sponsoring both online and on-site opportunities for practitioners and experts to exchange experiences, learn from best practices, and build the capacity of citizen groups to hold their governments accountable. Capacity Development: Providing expert technical assistance and support to strengthen ability of citizen groups to promote good governance in their own societies through constructive engagement with authorities. The Metzger Initiative scales up PTF’s past successes in rule of law, which include monitoring of institutions such as the Anti-Corruption Court in Uganda; selection of judges in Bolivia and Rwanda; application of India’s Right to Information Act to secure honest delivery of public services; formalization of property rights in Albania and Rwanda; monitoring of public procurement in Latvia and Pakistan; and curbing police corruption in Uganda, Pakistan, and the Philippines. Program Location Program Team Hadi Abushakra × Hadi Abushakra Hadi Abushakra has recently retired from the World Bank. A lawyer by training, he worked for 26 years at the World Bank and held a number of leadership positions. Prior to that, he was a practicing attorney in New York City. Hadi holds a JD in French law (Lyon University, France) a JD in Lebanese Law (St. Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon) and an LL.M from Harvard Law School. He and his wife, Kathy Stuart, have a 24 year old daughter. He enjoys running, reading (politics and history), travel and the cinematic arts. William J. Corcoran × William J. Corcoran Project Manager, Barry Metzger Rule of Law Initiative Bill Corcoran is the Manager of the Metzger Rule of Law Initiative of the Partnership for Transparency Fund in Washington, DC.  A graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, he served as a federal prosecutor with the Criminal Division of the U S Department of Justice and for 15 years prosecuted public officials for the commission of federal crimes, including public corruption.  He was an instructor for 25 years at the U S Department of Justice Advocacy Institute.  After serving with the Justice Department, he served for five years as Counsel, United States Senate Select Committee on Ethics. Roger Sullivan × Roger Sullivan Project Adviser Roger Sullivan is an International Economist and Team Coach who works on global development issues and currently serves as Secretary of the Partnership for Transparency Fund. He has been a regular contributor and editor to several World Bank Africa reports, including the Kenya Economic Update and a report on policy options for the new Kenyan government elected in March 2013. He has conducted team-building retreats for the economics team in Kenya and Bank country offices in the Middle East, and undertaken staff reviews for the Bank’s Indonesia Office and its South Asia regional country offices. During his long career at the World Bank, he developed and managed large agricultural projects in Nigeria and Ghana, spearheaded civil service reform programs in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda and led privatization efforts and government reform programs in Zambia and Malawi. He was sector manager for environmental and social development in the Africa Region and later moved to the Human Resources Vice Presidency to co-manage an innovative program that placed coaches on teams undertaking complex, multi-sector projects. Roger has a BA in economics from Stanford University and MA in international development from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Jane Schubert × Jane Schubert Project Adviser Jane is retired from a US government contractor whose funding sources were USAID and the World Bank, plus some private foundations. Her professional field is education — launched as a secondary school teacher prior to joining the contractor, where she managed and provided technical guidance to multi-year, large-scale education projects in Southern, East and West Africa, the Middle East. She continues to serve as an international consultant through Schubert Enterprises LLC to government contractors and the World Bank. She earned a Doctor of Arts in History from Carnegie Mellon University, specializing in West Africa.In addition to PTF, Jane also serves other organizations through board membership and advisory committees: Save the Children’s Global Education Advisory Board (GAEB); the Friends of Saint Benedict (FOSB); the Bishop’s Ranch of the Episcopal Diocese of California; the Outreach Commission of St.Alban’s Episcopal Parish in Washington,DC and other volunteer activities. Eleanor Schreiber × Eleanor Schreiber Ellie has been a member of PTF since 2011. She has worked on PTF projects in Latin America and Eastern Europe in the education, health and rule of law areas and co-managed the Eastern European program. Earlier, she spent 30 years at the World Bank working primarily in education but also in the health and public sector management areas. She volunteers for New Futures, a group that awards employment-oriented, postsecondary scholarships to lower-income students in the DC metropolitan area. She attended UC Berkeley as an undergraduate and received an MA from SAIS, Johns Hopkins. Program Media Video: Corruption Trial Monitoring Project Video: Milan Antonijevic on the Metzger Initiative Metzger Initiative Projects   Regional Gender-Based Violence Legal Training The Metzger Initiative partnered with the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative (ABA ROLI) and the Hogan Lovells law firm to to deliver a training program for licensed advocates and CSOs to increase their capacity to represent clients in cases involving gender-based violence and discrimination [...]   Review23 - Regional Rule of Law Network in the Western Balkans ReView23, founded in 2015, is a regional network of civil society organizations (CSOs) in the Western Balkans (Serbia, Macedonia, Montenegro) which share common goals linked to the rule of law, specifically to judicial reform. The long-range vision for the Network is to strengthen the rule of law in fighting corruption to bring about judicial and human rights reform in the region [...]     Regional Trial Monitoring Program in Eastern Europe In order to ensure that the law is being properly applied in the courtroom, the Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights (YUCOM) in Serbia partnered with the Youth Initiative for Human Rights (YIHR) in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina to develop a regional trial monitoring program [...]


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  • Citizen Action for Results, Transparency and Accountability (CARTA)

      Download Final Report (9.4 MB) Download independent assessment report (2.8 MB) Download program flyer (3.1 MB) The Citizen Action for Results, Transparency and Accountability (CARTA) program is a unique monitoring model that aims to provide donors and development agencies with more specific and real-time information on the impact of their projects. By building the capacity of local CSOs to conduct donor project monitoring, CARTA aims to strengthen ownership of outcomes, reduce the propensity of corruption and increase overall citizen engagement. THE CHALLENGE OUR SOLUTION THE STRATEGY OUR RESULTS Donors are recognizing the benefits of citizen engagement, social accountability and participatory monitoring as means to improve the impact of development projects. However, these activities are typically supervised, framed and funded by donors themselves, giving rise to potential conflict of interest for beneficiaries and evaluators. In theory, placing the funding, reporting, and other management functions with an independent third party will improve participatory monitoring by encouraging more effective community engagement, more honest feedback and more constructive stakeholder engagement. By the same token, building citizen capacity to demand good governance has been shown to reduce the overall propensity for corruption in development projects. In 2011, 12 sub-grants were awarded under the CARTA program, 6 each in Bangladesh and Nepal, for a total of US$1.29 million to support 11 World Bank financed projects in infrastructure, health, education and local government (see sub-project details below).Typically, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms are directly funded by the World Bank creating a conflict of interest for beneficiaries and evaluators. CARTA’s funding, provided by the Japanese Social Development Fund, and reporting channels are independent of the World Bank and provide new opportunities to meet on-the-ground needs. The overall goal of the pilot program was to "enhance the development impact, sustainability and client ownership of pro-poor projects financed by the World Bank in Bangladesh and Nepal, by promoting civil society organizations engagement, experience and capacity to demand better governance." It built the capacity of local CSOs to monitor the implementation of donor supported projects. This program marks the first time a major development organization has permitted independently financed participatory monitoring managed by a third-party. PTF collaboratively managed the CARTA program with the Manusher Jonno Foundation in Bangladesh and Helvetas Swiss Intercooperation in Nepal. Twelve sub-grants were awarded, 6 each in Bangladesh and Nepal, for a total of US$1.29 million to support 11 World Bank financed projects in infrastructure, health, education and local government. The sub-projects differed in scope, but all focused on empowering beneficiaries to demand greater transparency and accountability in resource use, delivery of services and grievance resolution. Local CSOs, government agencies and World Bank staff benefited from periodic trainings, workshops and technical support from PTF Project Advisers.The CARTA program's final report describes results and lessons in each sub-project in more detail, but the main lessons are that: There is a need to work on both the demand and supply sides while promoting social accountability; The need for adopting a constructive engagement approach in order to be trusted by project implementers and national stakeholders; The challenge of engaging traditionally marginalized community groups involves a greater effort by all stakeholders; Citizens and CSOs need training to create levels of knowledge and skills that empower them to engage constructively with service providers. Independent monitoring can be a valuable tool in catalyzing citizen engagement, not only because it builds self-reliance, but because it induces service providers to be more accountable. Social accountability tools and data-collection methods that are intended for use by citizens in the future should be as simple as possible. The sustainability of future citizen engagement depends on many factors—incentives, cultural factors, and power relations. Many of these take time to change; therefore short-term interventions will not likely be able to demonstrate results in the short term. Sub-Projects: Bangladesh Download the National Workshop Report Local Government Support Project (LGSP) Democracy Watch/Agrogoti Sangstha Bangladesh’s Local Government Support Project (LGSP-II) is a national decentralization plan that aims to strengthen local governance. LGSP II provides grants to Union Parishads (UPs) – the oldest and most local government system – so the community can determine which public projects serve them best. Thus, the main purpose of the project is to build the [...] Social Investment Program Project (SIPP-II) Bangladesh Disaster Preparedness Center Poverty alleviation is the greatest challenge Bangladesh currently faces. Although Bangladesh has shown impressive economic and social gains, the level of poverty continues to be a challenge with 32% of the total population living below the poverty line in 2010. The objective of the Social Investment Program Project (SIPP II) is to improve the livelihoods and quality of life, and build resilience to climate variability [...] Reaching Out-of-School Children Project II (ROSC2) RDRS Bangladesh The Government of Bangladesh has undertaken a number of targeted interventions, as part of its National Education Policy (2010), to ensure one-hundred percent enrollment and completion of primary education before 2015. The Reaching out of School Children Project (ROSC-II), launched in 2004, is  [...] Bangladesh Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project (BRWSSP) Resource Integration Center (RIC) The Bangladesh Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Program (BRWSPP) is funded by the World Bank and has a lifespan of four years, from July 2012 to June 2016. The project aims to ensure reliable access to arsenic-free, safe water in the rural areas of Bangladesh. The BRWSSP project included the [...] Rural Electrification and Renewable Energy Development (RERED II) Population Service and Training Center (PSTC) The Rural Electrification and Renewable Energy Development (RERED II) is a publicly funded project aimed at increasing access to electricity through Solar Home System (SHS) in “off-grid” rural areas of Bangladesh. Although it has been recognized as one of the largest and fastest growing [...] Sub-Projects: Nepal Rural Access Improvement and Decentralization Project (RAIDP) SKY-Samaj Nepal The Rural Access Improvement and Decentralization Project (RAIDP) aims to improve services related to health, education, agriculture and good governance in Nepal. Over the project period (2005 to 2013), over 2 million Nepalis have utilized improved rural transport infrastructures and services[...] Emergency Peace Support Project (EPSP) Samuhik Abhiyan (SA) The Emergency Peace Support Project (EPSP) seeks to contribute to the peace building process in Nepal by providing interim cash transfers and services to eligible conflict-affected groups. So far, interim cash benefits have been provided to 14,104 families of the deceased and 4,444 widows [...] School Sector Reform Project (SSRP) SKY-Samaj Nepal The School Sector Reform Project (SSRP) is a follow-up of the ongoing “Education for All” program in Nepal. Since 2010, free textbooks have been distributed to all students up to grade 10 in community schools throughout the country. According to the project guidelines, students are expected to receive [...] Enhanced Vocational Education and Training (EVENT) Vijaya Development Resource Center (VDRC) In 2011 and 2012, over 385,000 people left Nepal seeking better employment opportunities. Their remittances officially amounted to one quarter of the gross domestic product (GDP). More than 75% of migrant workers from Nepal are unskilled workers, leading to low remittance levels per migrant [...] Poverty Alleviation Fund 2 (PAF-2) Friend Service Council Nepal (FSCN) PAF-2 is a development project funded by the World Bank and implemented by the Poverty Alleviation Fund in Nepal. The project objective is to improve living conditions, livelihoods and empowerment among the rural poor, with particular attention to groups that have been excluded by reasons [...] Community Action for Nutrition (CAN) NUCLEUS FOR EMPOWERMENT THROUGH SKILL TRANSFER (NEST) The Sunaula Hazar Din – Community Action for Nutrition (SHD-CAN) Project was designed to address the risk factors of chronic malnutrition in children. From early 2014, Nucleus for Empowerment through Skill Transfer (NEST) undertook independent monitoring of the SHD-CAN project with [...]   Program Location Program News & Updates Development Projects Boosted by Citizen Demand for Good Governance 9 Sep 2016Citizen engagement is increasingly recognized as a method to help improve development program effectiveness. From 2011-2015, the Citizen Action for Results, Transparency and Accountability (CARTA) […] Enhancing Development Impact, Sustainability and Ownership of Development Projects through Citizen Engagement: Lessons from the CARTA Program 27 Jun 2016The Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) hosted a seminar on June 23, 2016 with Citizen Action for Results, Transparency and Accountability (CARTA) Program Director, Tjaarda […] New Frontiers in Citizen Engagement in World Bank Projects 6 Jun 2016On May 19th, the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) participated in a panel discussion on “New Frontiers in Citizen Engagement in World Bank Projects” at […] Program Videos Monitoring Rural Road Construction Solar Power Never Ends Good Governance at the Community Level Access to Safe Water and Sanitation CARTA Final Workshop (Bangladesh) CARTA Final Report (Helvetas) Program Team Fred TempleProject Manager, PEACE × Fred Temple Project Manager, PEACE Frederick T. Temple is an American national educated at Yale (BA, Politics and Economics, 1968) and MIT (PhD, Political Science, 1973). He taught at the University of Nairobi in Kenya during 1972-73 and was a Senior Researcher at Abt Associates in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, during 1974-76. After consulting assignments in Kenya, Tanzania and Ghana during 1974-76, he joined the staff of the World Bank in 1977. He worked on lending operations for 26 years, including assignments as Deputy Chief of the Bank’s Regional Mission in Bangkok, Chief of a division responsible at various times for energy, infrastructure and industry/trade/finance in Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka, Resident Representative in Turkey, and Country Director in Bangladesh, before serving as the Bank Group’s Ombudsman at the conclusion of his career. Since retiring in 2008, Mr. Temple has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, African Development Bank, and United Nations and volunteered as the program manager for the Nepal component of PTF’s CARTA program. He and his wife divide their time between Fairfax, Virginia, and Bangkok, Thailand. Evangelina Javierproject adviser × Evangelina Javier project adviser Dondon Parafinaproject adviser × Dondon Parafina project adviser Chingbong LeeProject Adviser × Chingbong Lee Project Adviser Willem Strubenproject adviser × Willem Struben project adviser Willem Struben is a Dutch economist, who joined the World Bank after a three year government assignment in Suriname. In the WB, he worked on Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, and East Asia and the Pacific in country operations, social sector development, and quality control (specialization in public administration, rural development, and community participation). This included field assignments in Tokyo and Jakarta. He is now a part-time project development consultant, as well as member/advisor of PTF. In the latter capacity, he has managed or is managing projects in India, Bangladesh, Honduras, Kenya, Ghana and Cameroon. Knud Kjaer NielsenProject adviser × Knud Kjaer Nielsen Project adviser Knud Kjaer Nielsen has been a member and senior adviser for PTF since its inception. He served in the Danish Foreign Ministry for almost 30 years as senior adviser on Development. His assignments abroad included heading the Danish Development office (DANIDA) in Tanzania and Bangladesh. Before joining the Foreign Service he served as a lecturer in engineering in Denmark and Tanzania, and managed a reconstruction project in Bangladesh after war of liberation. He is an electrical engineer by profession. Jeff KassProject Adviser × Jeff Kass Project Adviser Jeff has been a PTF member since April, 2011, serves on the PTF Management and Governance Committees and advises PTF projects in Africa and Asia. He is currently an independent consultant on strategy, governance and program evaluation. Prior to forming his consulting practice, he served as a corporate officer at International Paper Company, a large multi-national, in the following positions: Vice President and General Manager Hammermill Papers Division, and Vice President Strategic Planning and Vice President Sales for the printing sector. Jeff has an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BA in economics from Cornell University. Eleanor SchreiberProject Adviser × Eleanor Schreiber Project Adviser Ellie has been a member of PTF since 2011. She has worked on PTF projects in Latin America and Eastern Europe in the education, health and rule of law areas and co-managed the Eastern European program. Earlier, she spent 30 years at the World Bank working primarily in education but also in the health and public sector management areas. She volunteers for New Futures, a group that awards employment-oriented, postsecondary scholarships to lower-income students in the DC metropolitan area. She attended UC Berkeley as an undergraduate and received an MA from SAIS, Johns Hopkins. Barbara KafkaProject Adviser × Barbara Kafka Project Adviser Barbara Kafka served for over 33 years at the World Bank in a range of posts which involved her in the economic and social development of countries across Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, and East and South Asia. Positions held include Director, South Asia; Country Director of three African countries; and Division Chief of energy, industry and financial sector programs in the Middle East. Barbara also was involved in World Bank corporate policy and strategy development and several Bank-wide corporate committees. Barbara is a member of the Board of Directors of New Futures East Meets West Foundation. Barbara holds a B.A. in Economics from Duke University, and received an MBA, with a specialization in Finance and International Business, from MIT’s Sloan School of Management. In addition, she completed a Harvard/World Bank Executive Development Program and a certificate in non-profit management at Georgetown University. Lorena CurryGrants and Finance Manager × Lorena Curry Grants and Finance Manager Born in Buenos Aires, where she received her degree in Accounting from the University of Buenos Aires and subsequently found employment with the American Embassy in Argentina. Moved to the United States where she worked in accounting, finance and contract management. Most recent experience prior to PTF was five years as the Chief Financial Officer for two local, related non-profit organizations. Daniel RitchieProject Adviser × Daniel Ritchie Project Adviser Daniel is an independent consultant on economic development. He served in the World Bank for almost 30 years before retiring in 1997. His positions included Director for North Africa and Iran, Director of the Asia Region Technical Department, Deputy Director, Personnel Department, Chief, India Country Operations, Chief, Agriculture and Rural Development, Southern Europe. He currently serves as President of a scholarship fund in Kenya, Board Member for a scholarship fund for girls in South Sudan, and Board Member of other NGOs. Dan holds a degree in public administration. Ariel Shaker-BrownOperations Officer × Ariel Shaker-Brown Operations Officer Ariel is the Operations Associate for the Partnership for Transparency Fund. Before joining PTF, Ariel was the Program Coordinator for the German Marshall Fund’s MENA Partnership for Democracy & Development in Tunis, Tunisia. Throughout her time at the German Marshall Fund, Ariel opened the Tunis regional office and provided on the ground support for all MENA program activities. Prior to her Tunis posting, Ariel supported the German Marshall Fund’s Foreign Policy program as program assistant in the Washington, DC headquarters. Ariel received her Bachelor’s Degree in Government with a minor in Arabic from the College of William and Mary. While at William and Mary, she spent 6 months studying at the University of Jordan in Amman. Sarah LittlePrograms & Communications Manager × Sarah Little Programs & Communications Manager Sarah joined the Partnership for Transparency Fund in September 2013 to lead the organization’s communications and programs. Prior to joining PTF, Sarah worked at Gender Action, developing and executing communication campaigns focused on promoting gender justice and women’s rights in International Financial Institution (IFI) investments. Sarah has also managed communications for the office of the former United States Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Council. Sarah holds a BA in Political Science from American University and an MA in Democratic Governance from the University of Cape Town. Frank McNerneyCARTA PROGRAM MANAGER × Frank McNerney CARTA PROGRAM MANAGER Dr. McNerney is currently an independent consultant, who is working in various ways to improve higher education in developing countries. His particular areas of expertise are in finance and planning, public-private relationships, teacher training and the introduction of master’s level programs in education. Most recently, he consulted for the National University in Lesotho, where he analyzed regional tuition and fee structures in higher education institutions as well as university real estate investments. Prior to this position, he created and taught courses in education leadership, monitoring and evaluation at the Graduate School of Education at the American University in Cairo, and education policy and planning at Kabul Education University.


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  • Citizen Action Platform (CAP)

      The Citizen Action Platform (CAP) is a program designed to improve public services in developing countries by encouraging citizen participation in reporting corruption, mismanagement and maltreatment through the use of information and communications technology (ICT). The Challenge The Strategy The Results In many developing countries, government service delivery is often compromised by the absence of accountability and oversight, creating a situation rife for corruption. Life-saving medications go missing along the distribution chain, money designated for local development projects are pocketed, and students pay bribes for enrollment, promotion and graduation. Over the last 15 years, PTF has supported more than 250 projects in 53 countries where CSOs have acted as catalysts to greater citizen engagement and improved governance. Citizen leaders implementing these projects have relied on face-to-face contact and labor-intensive tools like citizen report cards, social audits, and right to information requests to promote good governance and reliable service delivery. These approaches are highly effectively at the grassroots, but expensive, unsustainable and difficult to scale.CAP is a program designed to improve public services in developing countries by encouraging citizen participation in reporting corruption, mismanagement and maltreatment through the use of information and communications technology (ICT). It revolutionizes the high-value, but historically high-cost of citizen reporting and monitoring of public services by systematically recording, aggregating, mapping and tracking grievances through their resolution. This information provides strong support for CSOs to constructively engage with service providers through a better understanding of where, when, and what issues citizens are most concerned about. As most community-based organizations have modest resources, program CAP partners with existing ICT applications to overcome the limitations of development and maintenance costs. The Anti Corruption Coalition Uganda (ACCU) and its local affiliate The Apac Anti Corruption Coalition have partnered with UNICEF and Transparency International- Uganda (TI-U) to field test the CAP program on public health service delivery in the Apac district of Uganda. Citizen grievances concerning health service delivery in the district are collected through: 1) SMS to UNICEF’s “Ureport” program; 2) calls to TI-U’s local toll-free hotline; 3) calls made to monthly radio talk-shows; 4) reports made to trained volunteer monitors; or 5) statements made during public meetings. These methods are supported by continuous awareness raising campaigns, such as, radio jingles, public performances and printed materials. All citizen reports are entered into the CAP’s ICT system by a central administrator and subsequently categorized, tracked, and mapped. The information produced helps CSOs more efficiently serve the community through tools like: geo-mapping complaints to help identify “hotspots” in need of attention; resolution time tracking to identify bottlenecks and ensure follow through; and categorization to help identify the appropriate authority to engage. These activities have been heavily supplemented by groundwork to engage with local authorities in resolving complaints. This has principally been accomplished through community meetings, dialogue with service providers, and coordinated local/national level advocacy.CAP has proven to be highly effective in identifying and resolving issues concerning the quality of public health services. A survey on the program found that that 93% of citizens have a better understanding of their right to health services, 62% feel government response to their problems has improved, and 62% have experienced improved health service delivery overall. These results indicate that our successes are not limited to a few fleeting instances, but real, sustainable change for the future. This kind of change is due to a transformation in the local community, which has demonstrated greater empowerment and participation in encouraging government transparency and accountability. Specific elements of this change are outlined below. Public awareness on health rights increased dramatically. A major component of the CAP program was awareness raising. Radio jingles informing citizens of their duty to report poor service delivery and fight corruption, and introducing the CAP program, were played 5 times a day, everyday (click here to listen). Dramatic performances demonstrated the impact of corruption on health service delivery. Citizens participated in direct dialogue with district health officials through monthly radio shows and community meetings. By January 2016, 93% of those interviewed said they had a clearer understanding of these rights through the program. The relationship between citizens, health workers and government authorities improved significantly. The program provides a mechanism for citizens, through the local CSO, to better articulate the community’s grievances with public health care. The data produced by the CAP’s technology presents the CSO with concrete evidence. This information was particularly helpful, for instance, when TAACC prepared and presented an argument for greater health service funding at the regional budget workshop. The communication between local and national level government authorities has improved. When issues reported through CAP required the attention of national level authorities, or were ignored by local officials, ACCU held strategic meetings with the Health Sector Anti-Corruption Working Group, a consortium of CSOs and the Ministry of Health, National Medical Stores, National Drug Authority, and other government authorities. The improved communication has also established an extra layer of accountability. Government authorities and health works have become more informed and vigilant. In fact, many of the complaints that came through the system were from health workers who were discouraged with the system, but felt they had no where to turn. Health Unit Management Committees (HUMCs) are charged with monitoring the general administration of village health centers on behalf of the government, but were practically non-functional in the target district, because health officials all but ignored their existence. Now, because of public pressure, district officials present reports of poor conduct to the HCMC as they’re supposed to. As a result, disciplinary committees are starting to function, addressing issues like, staff absenteeism, late coming, drug stock outs and corruption. The impacts of the limited pilot in Apac are local, sustainable and real. The program has also demonstrated workable modalities well suited for reducing corruption at a national scale. Therefore, PTF and ACCU, in partnership with UNICEF's Ureport program, are expanding the program in 2017, with the goal of national penetration by the end of 2019. Program Location PTF Program Team Frank McNerneyProgram Adviser   Read more × Frank McNerney Program Adviser Dr. McNerney is currently an independent consultant, who is working in various ways to improve higher education in developing countries. His particular areas of expertise are in finance and planning, public-private relationships, teacher training and the introduction of master’s level programs in education. Most recently, he consulted for the National University in Lesotho, where he analyzed regional tuition and fee structures in higher education institutions as well as university real estate investments. Prior to this position, he created and taught courses in education leadership, monitoring and evaluation at the Graduate School of Education at the American University in Cairo, and education policy and planning at Kabul Education University. Geoffrey OpioProgram Adviser   Read more × Geoffrey Opio Program Adviser Opio Geoffrey Atim is a Governance, Transparency & Accountability Practitioner with the goal to contribute to a society where resources are used effectively & equitably to meet citizens needs by promoting policy and practice that contributes to more open – transparent, participatory and accountable – governance. Most recently Geoff worked on large-scale health governance programme in Uganda, subjected to an RCT. Currently finalizing his MPhil in Development Policy and Practice in the Graduate school of development Policy and Practice University of Cape Town. Adewale OmoniyiProgram Adviser   Read more × Adewale Omoniyi Program Adviser Adewale Omoniyi is a Cyber Security and Privacy Solution Architect, IT systems assurance and Open Technologies subject matter expert recognized for providing thought, technical leadership to commercial and public sector clients. He leads IBM’s response to Federal client’s proposals within cloud based engagements, defining and designing managed services architecture and security as a service based models. Adewale earned his MBA from New York University with concentrations in Global Business and Strategy. Sarah LittlePrograms & Communications Manager   Read more × Sarah Little Programs & Communications Manager Sarah joined the Partnership for Transparency Fund in September 2013 to lead the organization’s communications and programs. Prior to joining PTF, Sarah worked at Gender Action, developing and executing communication campaigns focused on promoting gender justice and women’s rights in International Financial Institution (IFI) investments. Sarah has also managed communications for the office of the former United States Ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Council. Sarah holds a BA in Political Science from American University and an MA in Democratic Governance from the University of Cape Town. Program Documents Flyer   (861 kB) impact report Independent Evaluation 2014-2015        (1 MB) graphic         (2 MB) Program Videos Local News Report on poor health facilities Local News Report on bat infestation curbing illegal medicine sales   program success stories  


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