• Monitoring of Public Procurement at the Local Level

    Corruption in public procurement is the major social problem causing massive loss and wastage of public resources thus underdevelopment. Lack of effective citizens’ participation and intervention to make timely check on this problem is majorly caused by lack of transparency, the ignorance of linkages between public office functions and citizens roles in management of the public resources, capacity and information gaps. The project aimed at developing a universally acceptable model policy to formalize citizen’s participation in NAADs procurement planning and budgeting process in Bubaare and Vurra Sub Counties. Project Activities 13 New local community based procurement monitoring teams. were composed and trained to form empowered procurement monitoring groups. The training started with the initial allocation of 3 days and continued with backstopping field practical training focused on delivery of monitoring, tracking funds expenditure, participatory budgeting, and feedback and advocacy skills throughout the year. Indoor training sessions were held at Vurra Catholic church in Arua District and Bubare Church in Kabale District.  The community procurement monitors nominated representatives through a consultative meeting attended by 100 members to prepare for the Community Days and participation in the Budget conference was held on the 12th of the February 2012. Participatory budgeting training was delivered through backstopping services to sharpen value assessment skills. DTC meetings, Community Days and Sub County Budget conferences were organized and held to offer Local authorities an opportunity to present the budget for FY 2012/2013. A Community Awareness Program was designed to guide the publicity program to improve the awareness indicator. The baseline awareness indicator in both districts was only a tenth (11.8%) of the people that participated in the poll knew the NAADs procurement process. Four (4) Community days attracted at least 1000 altogether. 1000 info leaflets were distributed to take the message further than the event center. In Arua the mobile public address went around the local area. A Brass Band was hired to attract attention to the message of participation in monitoring NAADS procurement led the procession in Bubaare Sub county. Banners were printed both in English and local language and displayed. Results achieved The number of civil groups monitoring NAADs procurement processes increased by 13 composed of 7 members’ beyond the targeted teams. Capacity Building sessions improved the quality community monitors to effectively influence procurement decisions at lower local government level. Multiple training sessions were held to enable procurement monitors effectively conduct PETs to track NAADs funds in order to reduce budget leakages. The NAADs Community Procurement Monitors’ acquired value assessment skills for negotiation of realistic procurement budgets. Registered public savings from realistic public budgets increased efficiency due to compliance to public policy on profit and interest margins in public procurement The local government responsiveness the concerns and demands of people is exhibited by the LGs acceptance to have Ordinances developed informed by the local community members recommendations. Stronger collective voice demanding for public accountability and anti-corruption has generated government responsiveness to collective citizens’ demand. The lower local governments currently recognize the role of the community procurement monitors in the entire process thus increased Open NAADs procurement budgeting. Project Location Project Details CSO: International Network of Faith based Organizations fighting Corruption (INFOC) Years: 2011-2012 Grant Amount: $30,000 Corruption Problem: Corruption in public procurement Project Documents Project Plan - July 2011 Project Completion Report - February 2013


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  • Preventing Leakage of Anti Malaria Medicines in Uganda’s Health Sector: A Case of Selected Health Centres in Lira District

    This project was implemented by Anti Corruption Coalition Uganda (ACCU) in partnership with Uganda Law Society (ULS) with the support of Northern Uganda Anti Corruption Coalition (NUACC). The purpose was to reduce leakage of free malaria medicines by monitoring of the supply chain from the National Medical Stores (NMS) to the public health centres. The overall goal of the project was to improve public access to free malarial medicines destined for selected health centres in Lira district. Project Activities At the inception of the project, ACCU conducted a baseline survey in eight selected health centres in Lira District that explored the status of the delivery chain of medicine from NMS. A report was produced that highlighted the loopholes in the flow of medicine to health centres in Lira district that included among others: inadequate investigations of complaints regarding drug leakages, unlabeled tablets and poor record management.  ACCU also organized a training workshop for Independent Budget Monitors (IBMs) of Northern Uganda Anti-Corruption Coalition (NUACC) to equip IBMs with refresher skills and knowledge necessary for effective and efficient monitoring of public health centres in Lira District and to share experiences with NUACC on the state of corruption in the country. A total of seventeen bicycles and five cameras were also provided to monitors  in addition to a facilitation fee of 21,000/= per month to cover any monitoring related cost. With this facilitation, monitors engaged in monthly monitoring of the eight project target health facilities in Lira district. A total of four (4) Public Accountability Forums were held for the project. The overall objective of the PAF was to provide a platform for dialogue between duty holders and communities on the emerging issues relating to anti-malarial medicines. A combined total of approximately seven (700) people participated across the four PAFs. Politicians and technocrats participated in these forums and included the District Health Officer, Deputy Resident District Commissioner, Health Personnel, Local Council Chairpersons and Health facility users.  Several activities were also undertaken under a media and publicity campaign. A newspaper supplement was run in a local newspaper.  Posters and Stickers were developed and bore messages that encouraged transparency and accountability in the supply and provision of anti-malaria medicines. The message called for vigilance from the community in monitoring drug supply with view of preventing leakages of anti malaria medicines. A total of 150 radio spots were aired to the public at the local level in Lira district for a period of 60 days urging community members to play a role in preventing leakages of anti- malarial within their respective health centres.  Project Results During the periodical monitoring of the fourth quarter project, it was discovered by the team from ACCU and MHSDMU that NMS had supplied an anti-malarial drug (Fansidar) that was later recalled back by National Drug Authority (NDA) for having no met the standard for human consumption. This case was followed up by members of the Health Sector Anti Corruption Working Group. Shortly after presenting this case, the National Drug Authority came out recalling all substandard drugs and has suspended pharmaceuticals companies involved in the production of fake drugs. Monitors were pivotal in following up a case of suspected drug theft at Ogur HC IV. In October 2011, Joan Akello a volunteer at the Anti Retro Viral clinic at Ogur Health Centre IV was allegedly caught stealing 3 boxes of Anti-Malaria drug (Coartem) from the drug store of Ogur Health Centre IV. The accused was arrested and later had her file forwarded to the Central Police Station in Lira District. She was sentenced her to 3 months of Community Service and the stolen drugs had been recovered. NUACC was nominated to have a representative at the District whenever drugs from National Medical Stores are delivered. In liaison with the office the District Health Officer, the monitor has been available to ascertain the actual deliveries of anti-malaria medicines by National Medical Stores. Vans directly supply to lower health facilities during cycle six (6) of the delivery schedule according to information acquired from interviews with health facility personnel. There have been no more reported cases of night deliveries at any of the project health facilities. Free anti-malarial tablets were embossed with UG implying that were supplied by Government of Uganda and are not for Sale. This helps counter leakages as such drugs cannot be sold in the private market.   Project Location Project Details CSOs: Anti Corruption Coalition Uganda (ACCU) Uganda Law Society (ULS) Northern Uganda Anti Corruption Coalition (NUACC) Years: 2011-2012 Grant Amount: $35,000 Corruption Problem: Reducing leakage of government provided anti-malaria medicine Project Documents Baseline Survey Results – August 30, 2011 Project Completion Report – October 2012 Project Completion Assessment – September 2012


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  • We’re THIS close – last chance!

    Thank you! Over the last few weeks, you helped us raise 77% of our fundraising goal for this year. Thank you for your support. Thank you for partnering with us. Thank you for empowering the most vulnerable and driving life-changing programs. It's your support that allows us to do what we do. You are making our programs possible.  Thank you for being a part of our story, and the stories of thousands of men and women in developing countries, struggling to receive basic social services.   SEE YOUR IMPACT     MAKE A DONATION     We will be sending you a full report of the amazing impact of 2016, as well as our upcoming plans in the New Year. In the meantime, check out our impact page to see how you improved the lives of the poor this holiday season.      World Bank Employees and Retirees! We rely on the Community Connections Campaign to fund program development. There's just one week left to make your donation. Click here to make your pledge or download instructions on donating stock. Remember, the Bank matches every dollar of your contribution!


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  • Can we count on your support to fight corruption?

    Corruption is the one of the greatest obstacles to development. But it doesn't have to be. By donating to the Partnership for Transparency Fund you're supporting programs that help civil society organizations demand and obtain transparency and accountability from governments and development agencies. Learn More      Donate Now   Our Impact in 2016 35 CSOs supported in 8 developing countries 10,000 hours of expert pro-bono assistance 129 Million people in developing countries impacted by our programs How We Do It: The Transformative Power of Citizen Voice In Uganda, one of our target countries, a local health center was on the verge of collapsing, yet the government claimed nothing was wrong. Meanwhile, a swarm of bats estimated to be nearly one-million strong had colonized the facility, weakening its structure and creating health risks, including bat-born infections like rabies and Ebola. (Continue reading..) Upcoming Events


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  • New Report Released on Engaging Civil Society in the SDGs

    Civil Society & Development: Global Trends, Implications and Recommendations for Stakeholders in the 2030 Agenda   The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development commits all 193 UN Member States to achieving 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through collective efforts between a wide range of stakeholders, including governments, the private sector and civil society. The 2030 Declaration specifies roles and responsibilities for civil society to play but is ambiguous on how partnership structures would be forged at the national level. The Addis Ababa declaration on financing the SDGs is fuzzy on how civil society participation will be financed. Civil Society & Development: Global Trends, Implications and Recommendations for Stakeholders in the 2030 Agenda analyzes the trends in evolution of civl society growing role in development, reviews the implications of these trends for effective civl society participation during SDG implementation and offers recommendations for stakeholders (governments, bilateral and multilateral donors, foundations and private philanthropists and CSOs) to enable effective civll society participation in the 2030 Agenda. Learn More     Download Upcoming Events


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  • Citizen Action Platform: Amplifying Citizen Voice for Quality Healthcare in Uganda

      In many developing countries, quality health care is compromised by a lack of oversight at the local level. Poor pay, difficult living conditions and little supervision create a…


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  • Program to Strengthen Ukrainian Civil Society’s Role in Monitoring Public Procurement Launches on 24 January in Kyiv

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF) and the


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